CLAUDIA: We're Americans and we live in a free country; so all of us can do as we please here.

CARLOS: Laissez-faire?

CLAUDIA: I don't speak French.

CARLOS: If you want me to, I'll teach you.

CLAUDIA: What does that "laissez-faire" mean?

CARLOS: That here we can do any kind of business and nobody can do anything against us.

CLAUDIA: That's what I said.

CARLOS: That is a concern between the government and the people, but with me things are different.

CLAUDIA: Why?

CARLOS: Because I'm able to do anything.

CLAUDIA: Would you throw me in front of the train?

CARLOS: I would eliminate anybody who competes with me. It has nothing to do with you, that I swear!

CLAUDIA: If you swear, it's because you are a believer. Do you ever go the church?

CARLOS: When I was a child, I used to go with my mother. Now, I never go.

CLAUDIA: Why not?

CARLOS: Because my grandmother never goes to church.

CLAUDIA: Is she paralyzed?

CARLOS: Far from it, pretty girl. Instead of going to church, she goes to Atlantic City.

CLAUDIA: She switched religions, what a pity!

CARLOS: She switched the church for card games. (A train approaches.)

CARLOS: Will you come with me?

CLAUDIA: Where would you take me?

CARLOS: I'm going to the South Bronx.

CLAUDIA: I was born there.

CARLOS: I'm not asking where you were born, I'm inviting you to come with me.

CLAUDIA: Am I your hostage?

CARLOS: A hostage, of your own accord. (The subway train stops. The two youngsters board it. Blackout.)


Scene IV

4:00 P.M. CLAUDIA and CARLOS climb what is left of what appear to be stairs of the skeleton of a burned-out building. When

-121-

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Cuban American Theater
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Acknowledgements 2
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 7
  • Notes 17
  • Martínez by Leopoldo M. Hernández 19
  • About the Author 21
  • Act I 25
  • Act II 36
  • Your Better Half by Matías Montes Huidobro 53
  • About the Author 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 73
  • Act III 92
  • Birds Without Wings 111
  • About the Author 113
  • Act I 116
  • Act I 116
  • Scene II 117
  • Scene III 119
  • Scene IV 121
  • Scene V 127
  • Scene VI 130
  • Scene VII 131
  • Scene VIII 131
  • Act II 132
  • Scene I 132
  • Scene II 133
  • Scene III 138
  • Scene IV 141
  • Scene V 143
  • With All and for the Good of All (cuban Farce in Two Acts) 147
  • About the Author 149
  • Act I 153
  • A Little Something to Ease the Pain 193
  • About the Author 195
  • Prologue 199
  • Act I 202
  • Act II 226
  • Once Upon a Dream by Miguel González-Pando 239
  • About the Author 241
  • Act I 245
  • Act I 245
  • Second Scene: the Celebration 259
  • Act II 267
  • First Scene: the Betrayal 267
  • Second Scene: the End 274
  • Bibliography 279
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