MAURICIO: My daughter, the biggest problem in my life was that I've run away from the word of God. You know that He observes us and that He writes everything in his private agenda. Your Mother and I sinned. We failed to follow the commandments. It's not our fault. The universe put us to a test. We let ourselves into the mirage of material wealth and we sinned. The first time was there in the mountains where we were born. I've never spoken to you about this. Your mother and I grew up together on the same farm. I can't go into details because it is so long ago that I don't remember. There was a civil war. There was a bloody civil war which tried to wipe out a dictator of equal dimensions. Beheading was the word, even of children. There, in our America, blood began to run as if Herod were resurrected. One day, the news arrived that the guerrillas wanted to let the world know that they were the force behind our town. Father, who was one of them, commanded us to mount two horses and he tied your mother and me to the saddles. That's how we started our descent from the mountains toward the sea. We arrived there almost dehydrated. After that, days passed filled with anguish in which we were taken from one place to another. We crossed country boundaries, everywhere they spoke our language. At an early age, we learned that ice and fire are temporary accidents. Your mother has not written to me. Neither she nor I have any idea of the time that we'll have to spend behind bars. But I want you to know and I would like you to reassure your mother about this when you see her, that from now on, I'll give myself to propagate the word of God. (MAURICIO stands and vows.) And besides this, giving all diligence, add to your faith, virtue; and to virtue, knowledge and godliness; and to godliness, brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness, charity. (MAURICIO genuflects. Blackout.)


Scene II

A week later at Fort Tyron Park. CLAUDIA and CARLOS look at the Hudson River and plan what they want to do with their lives. At a distance we hear the final notes of a soprano singing "O Patria Mia," from the opera Aida, then the applause.

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cuban American Theater
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Acknowledgements 2
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction 7
  • Notes 17
  • Martínez by Leopoldo M. Hernández 19
  • About the Author 21
  • Act I 25
  • Act II 36
  • Your Better Half by Matías Montes Huidobro 53
  • About the Author 55
  • Act I 59
  • Act II 73
  • Act III 92
  • Birds Without Wings 111
  • About the Author 113
  • Act I 116
  • Act I 116
  • Scene II 117
  • Scene III 119
  • Scene IV 121
  • Scene V 127
  • Scene VI 130
  • Scene VII 131
  • Scene VIII 131
  • Act II 132
  • Scene I 132
  • Scene II 133
  • Scene III 138
  • Scene IV 141
  • Scene V 143
  • With All and for the Good of All (cuban Farce in Two Acts) 147
  • About the Author 149
  • Act I 153
  • A Little Something to Ease the Pain 193
  • About the Author 195
  • Prologue 199
  • Act I 202
  • Act II 226
  • Once Upon a Dream by Miguel González-Pando 239
  • About the Author 241
  • Act I 245
  • Act I 245
  • Second Scene: the Celebration 259
  • Act II 267
  • First Scene: the Betrayal 267
  • Second Scene: the End 274
  • Bibliography 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.