ACT I

From the black after PAYEhas exited, the stage lights come up to reveal some pillars and railings to indicate a verandah, and four large archways through which we see a kitchen, AMELIA's bedroom, CACHA's bedroom and the rest of the house beyond. The stage floor should be painted so that these rooms seem to be around a small square patio. There are steps leading from the corner stage right onto the verandah. There we see a suggestion of a door which leads into the house. PAYEcomes up the steps, feeling the heat, carrying the suitcase and shoulder-strap tape recorder. He looks through the open door, but does not go in. Instead he comes around to the corner of the verandah which will be down stag center. He looks to the left, to the rest of the verandah which stretches to the stage left corner. The walls between the verandah and house through which we see the patio and the rooms surrounding it are non-existent, but must be respected as walls and therefore there is another entrance at the stage left side of the verandah, which can be indicated by a hanging piece of tiled roof. PAYE looks at the house and speaks directly to the audience from the corner of the veranda center stage.

PAYE: (Addressing the audience.) My grandparents' house is a big square house which they rented until the Revolutionary Government passed a law giving the deed to the property to tenants who had paid rent for a period longer than twenty years. It is an old house, a Spanish colonial house, one of the oldest in the city of Santiago de Cuba. I was born in this house and I spent my childhood riding a tricycle on this verandah with assorted cousins--all boys! My grandparents' house has seen weddings and wakes, nine children, twenty-six grandchildren, fires, earthquakes, hurricanes, revolutions, departures and reunions. Now behind the door there is a little plaque stating the ownership of the occupants with the headline "Thank You, Fidel." (He picks up the suitcase and enters the house through the stage right door.)

PAYE: Abue! Good morning! Abuela! ( PAYEmoves into the patio. There are clothes on the line. A towel has fallen. He picks it up and is about to hang it when AMELIA enters. Alarmed by his presence, she grabs a mop and cocks it in mid air.)

AMELIA: Drop it!

PAYE: (Startled.) What?!

AMELIA: (Calling.) Dilia! Cacha!

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cuban American Theater
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.