Class Action Dilemmas: Pursuing Public Goals for Private Gain

By Deborah R. Hensler; Nicholas M. Pace et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We are grateful to the many lawyers, judges, other public officials, and business, consumer, and other public interest representatives who gave generously of their time and shared their perspectives, experiences, and information about class action litigation with us. We could not have conducted the study on which this book is based without their help.

We also want to thank Neuberger Berman, the New York-based investment management firm, for its generous financial support for our research and writing. Without their support, this project would not have been possible.

Additional support for the study was provided by more than a dozen law firms, corporations, and individuals, and by core funds from the Institute for Civil Justice. The names of all of the donors are listed at the conclusion of these acknowledgements.

All of those who helped fund the study did so without placing any conditions upon the design or conduct of our research, and none had any control over the publication of the results. We gratefully acknowledge these donors' willingness to support independent research in the public interest.

Many people encouraged us to undertake the study and offered advice along the way. We particularly want to thank Judge Patrick Higginbotham, whose interest in the use of empirical research in legal procedural reform stimulated us to consider such a project, and Sheila Birnbaum, Francis Hare, Judyth Pendell, Paul Rheingold, and Judith Resnik, who offered helpful counsel as the study progressed. Portions of the manuscript were written while Deborah Hensler was on the faculty at the University of Southern California Law School. She gratefully acknowledges the advice of her colleagues and the assistance of USC's wonderful law librarians.

We also wish to thank those who reviewed drafts of the manuscript and provided us with written and oral comments: Profs. Janet Alexander, Jennifer Arlen, Stephen Burbank, Francis McGovern, Arthur Miller, Judith Resnik, and Tom Rowe; John Aldock, John Beisner, Sheila Birnbaum, Kim Brunner,

-xxiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Class Action Dilemmas: Pursuing Public Goals for Private Gain
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 609

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.