Attitudes and Persuasion: Classic and Contemporary Approaches

By Richard E. Petty; John T. Cacioppo | Go to book overview
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Notes
1
Few subjects became suspicious about the confederates' names being the same as those the subjects previously saw. Berkowitz and Knurek suggest that this possibly is because such a large number of names were used in the conditioning phase of the study.
2
Alternatively, debaters often may agree more with the position advocated by the "winner" because the reasons he or she gave during the debate for holding that position were convincing to both. We discuss this process of attitude change in chapter 8.
3
We should note that Insko and Cialdini's analysis assumes that the reinforcers "good" and "humph" are equal with respect to their informational values and balanced with respect to their rapport value. Thus, each is presumed to contribute equally, though in opposing directions, to the development of rapport. In addition, it is assumed that the information value gained by saying "humph" equals the rapport value lost by saying it.
4
Weiss ( 1962, 1968) learning theory of persuasion and Wolpe ( 1958) work on systematic desensitization might be invoked to explain some forms of attitude change; but these positions are not discussed here since neither has received widespread application in social psychology.

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