Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative

By Daniel L. Overbey | Go to book overview

control, and can require carriers to use specific navigation and communication devices.

The typical transportation industry structure must be understood so that a comparison can be made with the railroad industry's unusual structure. The use of a common fixed way available to all carriers and the coexistence of different types of carriers are characteristic of the typical structure. The railroad industry, by contrast, maintains separate fixed ways for each carrier and has only common carriers.26


NOTES
1.
For an excellent study of each mode's structure see Donald V. Harper, Transportation in America: Users, Carriers, Government.
2.
Pipelines do not share the typical structure because of their technology. Motive power is part of the fixed way, as is the pipe (the carrying vehicle). Pipelines, furthermore, cannot compete for general freight and must transport only a narrow range of fluid commodities.
3.
Harper, pp. 367-374.
4.
Waterways of the United States, p. 85.
5.
U.S., General Services Administration, United States Government Manual 1974-1975, p. 177.
7.
Jeff L. Yates, "Delayed VTS Popular Topic at Annual Maritime Seminar," Waterways Journal, Volume 91, Number 26 ( September 24, 1977), p. 4.
8.
U.S. Government Manual, pp. 371-372.
9.
Harper, pp. 396-399.
10.
Robert Burkhardt, Federal Aviation Administration, p. 75.
11.
Ibid.
12.
Ibid.
13.
Aviation Fundamentals, rev. ed. ( Denver, 1974), p. 3-25 to p. 3-26. For discussions of future air traffic control systems, see Henry Lefer, "Air Traffic Control System for the 1990's and Beyond Is Gestating at FAA," Air Transport World, Volume 17, Number 4 ( April 1980), pp. 30-33; and Gilbert F. Quinby, "Anticipating Avionics Evolution," Air Transport World, Volume 17, Number 4 ( April 1980), pp. 36-41.
14.
Inland River Guide, 1977 Edition, pp. 171-365, 403-429. For detailed descriptions of waterway port operations see Eugene H. Lederer, Port Terminal Operations.
15.
Transportation Association of America, Transportation Facts & Trends, 15th ed. ( Washington, D.C.), p. 9. For a detailed account of economic regulation see Marvin L. Fair and John Guandolo, Transportation Regulation, 7th ed. ( Dubuque, Iowa, 1972).
16.
Charles A. Taff, Commercial Motor Transportation, p. 115.
18.
Charles G. Burck, "Truckers Roll Toward Deregulation," Fortune, Volume 98, Number 12 ( December 18, 1978), pp. 74-85; "ICC Evaluating Chairmans' Scheme for Wide-Spread Truck Deregulation," Traffic World, Number 7, Vol

-53-

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