Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative

By Daniel L. Overbey | Go to book overview
Save to active project

resistance on the part of the railroad companies. As preceding chapters have shown, the technological barriers to joint use have been removed; only economic and legal barriers remain.


NOTES
1.
Daniel L. Overbey, "Trackage Rights: Advantages and Disadvantages," Transportation Research Forum, Proceedings--Sixteenth Annual Meeting ( Oxford, Indiana, 1975), pp. 339-347; Jerry A. Pinkepank, "When (and Where and Why) Railroads Share Track," Trains, Volume 39, Number 3 ( January 1979), pp. 20-29.
2.
Among the cases which illustrate the ICC's lack of legal authority to compel the granting of trackage rights are Alabama, Tennessee, and Northern ( 124 ICC 114), Oregon, California, and Eastern ( 124 ICC 529), and Western Pacific ( 162 ICC 5).
3.
"Possibility of a Profitable D&H Line Held Out in Study Made for FRA," Traffic World, Number 11, Volume 182, Whole Number 3817 ( July 16, 1980), pp. 25-27; K. R. Zimmerman, "Big Little D&H," Trains, Volume 37, Number 2 ( December 1976), p. 12.
4.
"Runthrough Trains: The Proof Is in the Bottom Line," Railway Age, Volume 175, Number 4 ( February 25, 1974), pp. 28-29.
5.
"FRA Publishes Proposed Track Standards," Railway Age, Volume 170, Number 12 ( June 28, 1971), p. 12; "FRA Revises Track Standards," Railway Age, Volume 173, Number 5 ( September 11, 1972), p. 20.
6.
"FRA Proposes Equipment Inspection Standards," Railway Age, Volume 173, Number 6 ( September 25, 1972), p. 40.
7.
"FRA Will Draft Operating Rules," Railway Age, Volume 175, Number 21 ( November 11, 1974), p. 12.
8.
"Congress, Coleman Clash on Rail Bill," Railway Age, Volume 177, Number 2 ( January 12, 1976), p. 10; "An Advance to 1880?" Trains, Volume 37, Number 1 ( November 1976), pp. 7-9.

The FRA classifications are as follows: Class A Main Line, 20 million or more gross ton-miles per mile per year; Class B Main Line, 5 to 20 million gross ton-miles per mile per year; and Branch Lines, less than 5 million gross ton-miles per mile per year. Other designations and subcategories exist, but these are the major ones.

Corridors of consolidation potential include: Chicago-St. Paul, Chicago- Pittsburgh, Chicago-Buffalo, Chicago-Ohio River, Chicago-Kansas City, Kansas City-Ft. Worth, Ft. Worth-Houston, Chicago-Omaha, Kansas City and Omaha to Colorado, Chicago-St. Louis, and Chicago-Detroit.

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?