Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative

By Daniel L. Overbey | Go to book overview

telephone companies adhere closely to the classic natural monopoly model and have been regulated with a far greater degree of success.

The Free Enterprise Alternative would apply the concept of roadway/ carrier separation to the rail industry, separating carrier and fixed way functions as in the other modes (highway, water, and air). Regional roadway companies, each owning all rail roadways in its region, would be true natural monopolies and would be regulated as such. Numerous carriers, sharing use of the roadway network, would constitute a free, competitive market in which government regulation would be unnecessary. The functions, structure, and regulation of each industry segment--roadways and carriers-- would be properly matched, maximizing efficiency and effectiveness. The Free Enterprise Alternative would provide economic regulation only where necessary and eliminate it where unnecessary.


NOTES
1.
Donald V. Harper, Transportation in America: Users, Carriers, Government ( Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1978), pp. 112-121. With economic regulation removed, carriers would still be subject to certain requirements. Common law defines the common carrier by the carrier's offering of its services to the public on a continual basis. The common carrier must accept shipments to the limits of its service capacity; however, the carrier can restrict the types of commodities it moves. The common carrier is held liable for loss or damage to shipments, except for loss or damage caused by acts of God, acts of public enemy, negligence of the shipper, inherent nature of the goods, or acts of public authority. There is also a duty to deliver the shipment to the right person. Interstate commerce regulations have further defined these obligations, but the basic law applies as well to common carriers outside the realm of economic regulation.
2.
Market mechanisms for truck transportation such as rate clearinghouses, brokers, and auction markets are described in U.S., Department of Transportation, A Long Term Study of Produce Transportation, Volume 2, General Summary, Final Report ( Washington, D.C., 1977), pp. 66-84.

Descriptions of the barge transportation auction market include (in chronological order): "Barge Freight Trading Auction to Begin August 1," Waterways Journal, Volume 92, Number 17 ( July 22, 1978), p. 5; "St. Louis Barge Freight Trading Begins," Waterways Journal, Volume 92, Number 19 ( August 5, 1978), p. 5; "Open Auction for Fertilizer Transport in Offing," Waterways Journal, Volume 93, Number 9 ( June 2, 1979), p. 29; "Fertilizer Call Session," Waterways Journal, Volume 93, Number 12 ( June 23, 1979), p. 31; Dan Layton, "Trading Sessions to Open for Upbound River Freight," Waterways Journal, Volume 93, Number 22 ( September 1, 1979), p. 6; "Merchants Exchange Reports Gains," Waterways Journal, Volume 93, Number 42 ( January 19, 1980), p. 7; "Exchange Expands Scope of Barge Freight Trading," Traffic World, Number 5, Volume 183, Whole Number 3824 ( August 4, 1980), pp. 28-29.

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Titles From Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - Development of The Railway 3
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - A Product of Necessity 9
  • Notes 13
  • 3 - Degrees Of Standardization 15
  • Notes 18
  • 4 - Changing Times, 4 Changing Needs 19
  • Notes 31
  • Appendix To Chapter 4 Tables 1-4 33
  • 5 - For Everyone Else: The Typical Transportation Industry Structure 41
  • Notes 53
  • 6 - Railroad Industry Structure 55
  • Notes 65
  • 7 - Aspects of Joint Use 67
  • Notes 73
  • 8 - Aspects of Innovation 75
  • Notes 87
  • 9: Economics And Structure 91
  • Appendix To Chapter 9 109
  • 10 - In Theory, in Congress 113
  • Notes 124
  • 11 - A Proposal 127
  • 12 - Roadway Companies 131
  • 13 - Carrier Companies 147
  • Notes 161
  • 14 - Terminals 163
  • 15 - Regulation 173
  • Notes 181
  • 16 - Opportunity For Innovation 183
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix To Chapter 16 Service Alternatives For Short-Haul Traffic 195
  • 17 - The Promise And The Prospects 199
  • Notes 204
  • 18 - A Logical Conclusion 207
  • Notes 210
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.