Chavez and the Farm Workers

By Ronald B. Taylor | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE : THE FARM WORKERS

On Tuesday, January 15, 1974, Pablo Navarro Arellanos got up sometime after midnight, as was his custom, and drove the old school bus through the dark streets into downtown Calexico.Even at 2:30 A.M. the streets were peopled with the hurrying shadows of farm workers crossing the U.S.—Mexican border from the sprawling, dusty, metropolitan Mexicali into this small California town.They walked quickly, in twos and threes, each carrying a lunch, a soda, and a water bottle in a plastic shopping bag; hundreds of men, women, and children headed for a dozen or more informal labor shapeups that transpire daily in the pre-dawn.

Pablo Arellanos, no longer a young man, considered himself lucky.Instead of having to hustle into the shapeup and then bend his back all day in the hot fields of the Imperial Valley, he worked as a bus driver and crew pusher for labor contractor Jesús Ayala.Although the bus wasn't in the best shape the wiring was bad, the motor smells came up through the holes in the floor by his feet, and the emergency brake didn't work well it was a good job. He worked long hours driving and working the crew, driving home, and then, cleaning and servicing the bus after the day was over; but the job paid more than field labor. It was a job that could lead to better opportunities. But Pablo Arellanos had no future; by dawn he would be dead.

Arellanos turned the bus north at the corner of Second and Imperial, drove a half block on Imperial, and pulled into the red zone, next to Hotel El Rey.Already a few people were

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chavez and the Farm Workers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.