Chavez and the Farm Workers

By Ronald B. Taylor | Go to book overview

[In] every strike the charge of agitator is made by those serving the interest of the bosses in order to continue exploitation of workers ...

Despite the rhetoric and anger, the efforts of state and federal mediators began to have an effect. A fact-finding commission suggested a 75-cent-per-100-pound compromise, and the San Joaquin Valley Agriculture Labor Bureau accepted the offer.In a last-ditch effort to establish union recognition, cAwIu leaders attempted to drag their feet, but the battered, starving farm workers in the Corcoran camp would tolerate no more action. CAWIU accepted the 75-cent offer and a hand-scrawled sign was nailed to the Corcoran strike camp gate: "THE STRIKE IS OVER."


CHAPTER FOUR : CHAVEZ:
THE BEGINNING

The cotton strikes of 1933 were a qualified success. A ragtag army of 18,000 workers — many of them Mexican immigrants recruited into California agriculture — had stood up to the combined efforts of the San Joaquin Valley agribusiness establishment and won a 15-cent-per-100-pound increase in pay.To the average picker the sum itself was insignificant — it meant 30 to 45 cents more a day — but the victory was important. Workers had proven they could stand fast against vigilante terror tactics. Reacting to this limited success, the California Farm Bureau and the state Chamber of Commerce formed a three-man committee to investigate the "labor trouble" and make recommendations.Their report: Ninety percent of the strikes and labor disturbances that had taken place in 1933 had been caused and financed

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Chavez and the Farm Workers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Chavez and the Farm Workers *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter One - : the Farm Workers 1
  • Chapter Two - : the Union 13
  • Chapter Three - : A Bloody Past 36
  • Chapter Four - : Chavez 57
  • Chapter Five - : Early Organizing 75
  • Chapter Six - : La Causa 106
  • Chapter Seven - : Delano Grape Strike 129
  • Chapter Eight : Power Struggle 156
  • Chapter Nine : First Successes 180
  • Chapter Ten : the Fast 208
  • Chapter Eleven : the Teamsters Again 249
  • Chapter Twelve : Agribusiness Conspiracy 284
  • Suggested Reading 333
  • Index 335
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