Chavez and the Farm Workers

By Ronald B. Taylor | Go to book overview

petitions; Chatfield claimed entire pages of petitions had been signed in the same handwriting.

Even though they had turned the situation back on the farmers, Chavez was extremely anxious about the campaign. He felt the law, if passed, would spell the end of the union. Chavez personally stumped the state at a fierce clip, turning himself over to each of the boycott-anti 22 committees to do with him what they felt was best; he talked and marched and was interviewed until he was near exhaustion. Chavez spent the last few days of the campaign in Los Angeles.

Chatfield said, "He was really uptight.He was pacing the floor, and asking if were doing everything we could. I'd never seen him so worried. We didn't know what to do with him, how to make the best use of him. We put him on the human billboard for a while, that sort of thing."

Chavez kept asking Chatfield if he was doing all that could be done. Chatfield finally snapped back, "Yes, goodammit, everything's being done that can be done." The UFW efforts were more than enough.

On November 7, 1972, the California voters soundly rejected Proposition 22. The United Farm Workers had proven, both in Arizona and California, that they could mount a political campaign and, given an issue, carry that campaign to success.The message was not lost on agribusiness.


CHAPTER TWELVE :
AGRIBUSINESS CONSPIRACY

The UFWA— Schenley Ranch contract first negotiated in 1966 and renegotiated in 1969 had a June 21, 1972, expiration date.During the term of the second contract, Schenley Industries sold the 5,00o acres of vineyards to Buttes Gas and Oil, a small, aggressive conglomerate that had already "taken

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Chavez and the Farm Workers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Chavez and the Farm Workers *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter One - : the Farm Workers 1
  • Chapter Two - : the Union 13
  • Chapter Three - : A Bloody Past 36
  • Chapter Four - : Chavez 57
  • Chapter Five - : Early Organizing 75
  • Chapter Six - : La Causa 106
  • Chapter Seven - : Delano Grape Strike 129
  • Chapter Eight : Power Struggle 156
  • Chapter Nine : First Successes 180
  • Chapter Ten : the Fast 208
  • Chapter Eleven : the Teamsters Again 249
  • Chapter Twelve : Agribusiness Conspiracy 284
  • Suggested Reading 333
  • Index 335
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