Crime in a Free Society: Selections from the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice

By Robert W. Winslow | Go to book overview

7 White-collar crime

The term white-collar crime was first popularized by Edwin H. Sutherland in 1939. Until the publication in 1949 of his pioneering study. White Collar Crime, 1 virtually all criminological literature dealt with ordinary crimes—crimes most prevalent among persons in the lower socioeconomic classes. Donald R. Cressey , in his introduction to the 1961 edition of White Collar Crime, observed that "the lasting merit of this book * * * is its demonstration that a pattern of crime can be found to exist outside both the focus of popular preoccupation with crime and the focus of scientific investigation of crime and criminality." 2

Sutherland defined white-collar crime as "crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation." 3 But the term white-collar crime has generally come to include crimes such as tax fraud, which are not necessarily committed either in connection with an occupation or by persons of "high" social status, but are as a general matter committed by the relatively well-to-do.This definition excludes so-called street crimes, such as burglary, robbery or aggravated assault, which are occasionally, but not generally, committed by persons of means.

As applied to regulatory offenses, the scope of white-collar criminality has expanded in recent years. Until the late 19th century, the economic life of this country was largely unregulated, but over the years it became clear that business enterprise had to be regulated in order to protect both the public and business itself—to maintain standards of health and safety, to assist the poor and ignorant, to obtain decent housing and other necessities, and to maintain the economy at a high level of production. Today virtually every aspect of business life is regulated in some way. There are antitrust laws, food and drug laws, safety and health laws, licensing systems for different kinds of

____________________
1
Sutherland, White Collar Crime (Dryden Press, Inc., 1949).
2
Donald R. Cressey, " Foreword," in Sutherland, White Collar Crime ( New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1961), p. xii.
3
Address to the American Sociological Society, 1939.

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crime in a Free Society: Selections from the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Crime in a Free Society - Selections from the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: The Amount and Trends of Crime 34
  • 3: Criminal Statistics —an Urgently Needed Resource 73
  • 4: The Etiology of Crime 106
  • 5: The Ecology of Crime 142
  • 6: Professional Crime 163
  • 7: White-Collar Crime 175
  • 8: Organized Crime 191
  • 9: Narcotics and Drug Abuse 217
  • 10: Drunkenness Offenses 248
  • 11: The Police 257
  • 12: The Courts 289
  • 13: Corrections 324
  • 14: A National Strategy 361
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 378

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.