Equality, Diversity and Disadvantage in Employment

By Mike Noon; Emmanuel Ogbonna | Go to book overview

13 The Full Monty: Men
into Women's Work?

Irene Bruegel1


INTRODUCTION

Ed Balls, the advisor to the UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, Gordon Brown, saw British men as having lost 'the battle of the sexes' for jobs by the mid-1990s (Balls, 1994; Coward, 1999). Indeed, in certain areas of Britain, women are as likely to have a job as men (Benn, 1998). Unemployment trends, especially for the less-qualified, certainly give the impression that men in Britain are losing out in the share of all the jobs available.Feminisation of employment does not spell the feminisation of power, but some writers have suggested it means the feminisation of men (McDowell, 1991), whilst others argue that it may signal a shift in gender relations (Bradley, 1998). The British Equal Opportunities Commission have increasingly taken up complaints from men about sex discrimination (EOC, 1996).

This chapter examines the case for seeing individual men as potential victims of the sex stereotyping that otherwise structures male labour market advantage in Britain.The discussion is divided into two parts: first, the gender restructuring process in Britain in the 1980s and 1990s is analysed; and, second, the attributes of the men who have been able to enter jobs that are generally type-cast as female are considered. The barriers to working across the gender divide are such that those that do so are in some ways atypical. An examination of their characteristics should demonstrate something of the barriers to 'gender‐ incongruent' working.

The raw picture of women holding an ever greater proportion of jobs needs to be qualified, of course. Men still hold the bulk of the full-time jobs, the better-paid jobs and the jobs that offer both status and power. 2 Moreover, the growing female proportion of the labour market active population has not generally implied any forced displacement of men from paid work.There is equally no reason to suppose that there is a fixed quota of jobs, such that those held by women are held at the expense of men.

-208-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Equality, Diversity and Disadvantage in Employment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.