The Paradox of Change: American Women in the 20th Century

By William H. Chafe | Go to book overview

Index
Abbott, Grace, 70
abolitionism, 4
abortion, 204, 216-20
Adams, Mildred, 102
Addams, Jane, 11-12, 15, 31
Adkins case, 56, 89-91
A Doll's House,194
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), 225
aircraft industry, 125-26, 159
Allen, Frederick Lewis, 64-65
Alien, Pam, 209
Allport, Gordon, 232
Amalgamated Clothing Workers (ACW), 80, 95-96
American Association of University Women, 75, 180
American Collegiate Association, 112
American Federation of Labor (AFL), 82, 116; attitude toward WTUL, 87-88, 89; policy toward organizing women, 87-90. See also unionization of women; Women's Trade
Union League
American Management Association, 123
American Medical Association, 73
American Mercury,104
Anderson, Karen, 146, 161
Anderson, Mary, 39, 69; on Equal Rights Amendment, 53, 56, 166; on "pin-money" theory, 77; on women's employment during World War II, 122-23, 126, 131, 135-37
Anthony, Susan B., 7
Anthony, Susan B. IV, 163
anti-feminism, 213, 215-20
Atkinson, Ti-Grace, 206-7
Atlantic Monthly,115
Austin, Marcy, 66
Babson, Roger, 100
"baby boom," 186
Baker, Ella, 197
Baker, Newton, 17
Baker, Paula, 9-10, 35, 42
Baltimore, 125, 144, 160
Banning, Margaret Culkin, 133
Baruch, Bernard, 142, 147
Beard, Mary, vii, 55-56
Belmont, Alva, 79
Benedict, Ruth, 111
Bennett College, 101
Berger, Peter, 107, 182
Bernard, Jessie, 104 birth control, 105
Blackwell, Elizabeth, 108
black women, 12-15, 35, 68-71, 73, 81, 101, 127-28, 176, 197-99, 208, 212-13, 225, 227, 238
Blair, Emily Newell, 28, 30
Blatch, Harriet Stanton, 66
Blood, Robert, 191
Boeing Aircraft, 142
Bordin, Ruth, 11
Bradley, Joseph, 52
Bradwell, Myra, 52
Brandeis, Louis, 57
Bromley, Dorothy Dunbar, 103
Brooklyn Navy Yard, 139
Brooklyn Rapid Transit, 54
Brown, Antoinette, 108
Brown and Sharp Manufacturing case, 138
Bryant, Louise, 106
Bryn Mawr, 91
"Bull-Moose" party, 18
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 159
business and professional women, 65, 70-72, 99-101; role conflict of, 109-12; during

-251-

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