Lectures on Modern History

By John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton; John Neville Figgis et al. | Go to book overview

LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY

BY
JOHN EMERICH EDWARD DALBERG-ACTON FIRST BARON ACTON

D.C.L., LL. D., ETC. ETC.

REGIUS PROFESSOR OF MODERN HISTORY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

EDITED WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY
JOHN NEVILLE FIGGIS, M.A. SOMETIME LECTURER IN ST. CATHARINE'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

AND
REGINALD VERE LAURENCE, M.A. FELLOW AND LECTURER OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE

MACMILLAN AND CO., LIMITED ST. MARTIN'S STREET, LONDON 1952

-iii-

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Lectures on Modern History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Prefatory Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction- Lord Acton as Professor ix
  • Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History 1
  • 1- Beginning of the Modern State 31
  • II- The New World 52
  • III- The Renaissance 71
  • IV- Luther 90
  • V- The Counter-Reformation 108
  • VI- Calvin and Henry VIII 126
  • VII- Philip Ii., Mary Stuart, and Elizabeth 144
  • VIII- The Huguenots and the League 155
  • IX- Henry the Fourth and Richelieu 168
  • X- The Thirty Years'' War 181
  • XII- The Rise of the Whigs 206
  • XIII- The English Revolution 219
  • XIV- Lewis the Fourteenth 233
  • XV- The War of the Spanish Succession 249
  • XVI- The Hanoverian Settlement 264
  • XVII- Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia 277
  • XVIII- Frederic the Great 290
  • XIX- The American Revolution 305
  • Appendix I 315
  • Appendix II- Notes to the Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History 319
  • Index 343
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