Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview

vidually as well as collaboratively to further their learning. This finding may well relate to underlying differences in student learning strategies and calls for designing learning environments and curriculum that can be flexibly used by students with different preferences.

Engaging students in argumentation using evidence from the Web can be a knowledge integration activity. This integration can result from individual as well as collaborative mechanisms of making thinking visible. If we better understand how these mechanisms can be facilitated in complex classroom settings through the design of software tools like SenseMaker, technology will then be able to be used more powerfully as a learning partner in today's classrooms.


Acknowledgments

The author would like to acknowledge the rest of the KIE Research Group for their collaboration and insight, including Marcia Linn, Doug Clark, Alex Cuthbert, Elizabeth Davis, Brian Foley, Christopher Hoadley, Sherry Hsi, Doug Kirkpatrick, Linda Shear, Jim Slotta, and Judy Stern. In particular, Elizabeth Davis provided analyses involving students' epistemological ideas about science from her dissertation work. This material is based on research supported by the National Science Foundation under grant No. RED-9453861. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of the NSF.


References

Bell, P., Davis, E. A., & Linn, M. C. ( 1995). The knowledge integration environment: Theory and design. In Proceedings of the Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Conference '95 (14-21). Mahwah, NJ: LEA.

Cavalli-Sforza, V., Weiner, A., & Lesgold, A. ( 1994). Software support for students engaging in scientific activity and scientific controversy. Science Educ., 78(6), 577-599.

Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Holum, A. (1991). Cognitive apprenticeship: Making thinking visible. American Educator, 6(11), 38-46.

diSessa, A. A. ( 1994). What do "just plain folk" know about physics? In D. R. Olson (Ed.), Handbook of Education & Human Development: New Models of Learning, Teaching & Schooling.

Driver, R., Leach, J., Millar, R., & Scott, P. ( 1996). Young People's Images of Science. UK: Open University.

Hsi, S., and Hoadley, C. M. ( 1997) Productive discussion in science: gender equity through electronic discourse. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 6(1), 23-36.

Koslowski, B. ( 1996). Theory and Evidence: The Development of Scientific Reasoning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Linn, M. C., Bell, P., & Hsi, S. (in press). Using the internet to enhance student learning in science: The knowledge integration environment. To appear in Interactive Learning Environments.

Linn, M. C., diSessa, A., Pea, R. D., & Songer, N. B. ( 1994). Can research on science learning and instruction inform standards for science education? Journal of Science Education and Technology, 3(1), 7-15.

Reiner, M., Pea, R. D., & Shulman, d. J. ( 1995). Impact of simulator-based instruction on diagramming in geometrical optics by introductory physics students. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 4(3), 199-226.

Scardamalia, M., & Bereiter, C. ( 1991). Higher levels of agency for children in knowledge building: A challenge for the design of new knowledge media. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 1, 37-68.

Schank, P. ( 1995). Computational tools for modeling and aiding reasoning: Assessing and applying the theory of explanatory coherence. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Berkeley.

Smolensky, P., Fox, B., King, R., & Lewis, C. ( 1988). Computer-aided reasoned discourse or, how to argue with a computer. In R. Guindon (Ed.), Cognitive Engineering in the Design of Human-Computer Interaction and Expert Systems, (pp. 109-162). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Songer, N. B. & Linn, M. C. ( 1992). How do students' views of science influence knowledge integration? In M. K. Pearsall (Ed.), Scope, sequence and coordination of secondary school science, Vol. II: Relevant research (pp. 197-219). Wash., DC: NSTA.

Toulmin, S. ( 1958). The layout of arguments, The Uses of Argument, (pp. 94-145). Cambridge: Cambridge Press.


Author's Address

Philip Bell: Graduate School of Education, University of California, 4533 Tolman Hall #1670, Berkeley, CA, 94720.

pbell@socrates.berkeley.edu

http://www.kie.berkeley.edu/people/yuppo.html

-19-

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