Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview

Summary

In summary, teachers, site coordinators, school administrators, and faculty are highly enthusiastic about the NetCourse concept. The netseminar has been, so far, successful in encouraging teacher reflection, providing hands-on technology experiences, and first-hand experiences in computer- mediated communication. However, both teachers and faculty in the TLC netseminar anticipate challenges in redefining their new roles as virtual faculty and virtual teachers, as well as changes to their instructional style to deliver successful NetCourses.

Networked technologies permit peer review, critique, and new forms of collaboration. However, in order to capitalize on this requires a cultural shift on the part of teachers to value collaboration and capitalize the collaborative potential of networked activities as well as improve partnering in face-to-face school contexts between site coordinators and teachers. For example, although teachers can now share NetCourse ideas with other teachers, broadcasting information one-to-many, and team-teach a virtual course, the culture of creating a lesson plan alone is normative practice.

Experimental research with NetCourses as a model of scalable instruction is in its early stages. Future experiences will help to contribute to the knowledge of computer-supported collaborative learning, not only as test-bed for new collaborative technologies, but towards a design science for informing us about educational practice, reform, and new possibilities for networked learning.


Acknowledgments

The authors give special thanks to the staff at the Concord Consortium especially Alice Smith, Bruce Droste, Sarah Haavind, Carla Melucci, David Pitkin, Raymond Rose, Carolyn Staudt, VHS teachers and site coordinators, Marsha West of Forks High School, Sheldon Berman and Liz Pape of the Hudson Public Schools, and fellow netfaculty Boris Berenfeld, Robert McLean, Edgar Taylor, and Barbara Tinker.

This material is based on research supported by the U.S. Department of Education Challenge Grants for Technology in Education to Hudson Public Schools. (Grant #CFDA 84.303A-R303A60571)


References

Harasim, L., Hiltz, S. R., & Turoff, M. ( 1995). Learning networks: a field guide to teaching and learning online. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Harris, J. B. ( 1994) "Telecommunications training by immersion: university courses on-line". Machine- Mediated Learning, 4 ( 2& 3):117-185. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Hiltz, S. R. ( 1994). The virtual classroom: learning without limits via computer networks Norwood, N.J: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

NTEN, 1995. National Teachers Enhancement Network: http://www.montana.edu/∼wwwxs/index.html

Spradley, J. P. ( 1979). The ethnographic interview. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Riel, M. & Levin, J. ( 1990). "Building electronic communities: Success and failure in computer networking". Instructional Science, 19145-169.

Riel, M. & Harasim, L. ( 1994). "Research perspectives on network learning". In Friedman, E. & Lesgold, A. Machine-mediated learning (pp 91-113). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Tinker, R. & Haavind, S. ( 1996). "NetCourses and Netseminars: Current Practice and New Designs". Journal of Science Education and Technology, 5( 3), 217-223.

Zucker, A., Kozma, R. B., Young, V. M., Collier, M. Findings from the Baseline Survey of Virtual High School Teachers. Report prepared by SRI International, SRI Project 7289, September 1997


Author's Addresses

Sherry Hsi, University of California at Berkeley, Cognition & Development Area, School of Education, Berkeley, CA 94720-1670 (510) 642- 9717,

Robert Tinker, The Concord Consortium, 37 Thoreau Street, Concord, MA 01742, (978) 371-3476

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