Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview
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efficient collaborative learning. CSCL environments should not prevent conflicts, but rather provide conditions for their constructive resolution.

To sum up, in this paper we employed the conceptual system of Activity Theory in an exploration into the nature of learning in the Zone of Proximal Development. We proposed that this learning is determined by an interplay between individual and collective activities. Cultural settings provide resources, affordances, and constraints to involve participants in new collective activities. While people might enter collective activities for a number of personal reasons, such activities often develop according to their own logic, so that learners have to coordinate two different perspectives -- the individual view and the collective view. In the process of such coordination learners can acquire new personal meanings, strategies, and skills.


References

Favorin, M. ( 1995) "Towards computer support for collaborative learning at work: Six requirements". In: J. L. Schnasse and E. L. Cunnius (eds.) Proceedings of CSCL'95, The First International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning ( Bloomington, Indiana, USA, October 17-20, 1995). Lawrence Erlbaum,

Blaye, A., Light, P. ( 1995). Collaborative problem solving with HyperCard. In The influence of peer interaction on planning and information handling strategies. In C. O'Malley (Ed.), Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. Berlin: Springer.

Cole, M. ( 1985). The Zone of Proximal Development: Where culture and cognition create each other. In J. Wertsch (Ed.), Culture, communication, and cognition: Vygotskian perspectives. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Engeström, Y. ( 1992). Learning, working, and imagining: Twelve studies in activity theory. Helsinki: Orienta-Konsultit Oy.

Grudin, J. ( 1990, September). Why CSCW applications fail: Problems in design and evaluation of organizational interfaces. Proceedings of the CSCW'90 Conference. Portland, Oregon.

Kaptelinin, V. (in press). Learning together: Educational benefits and prospects for computer support (to appear in Interactive Learning Environments).

Koschmann, T. ( 1996). Paradigm shifts and instructional technology. In T. Koschmann (Ed.), CSCL: Theory and practice of an emerging paradigm. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Leontiev, A. N. Activity. Consciousness. Personality. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall 1978.

Nicolopoulou, A. & Cole, M. ( 1993). Generation and transmission of shared knowledge in the culture of collaborative learning: The Fifth Dimension, its play-world, and its institutional context. In E. A. Forman, N. Minnick, & C. A. Stone (Eds.) Context for learning: sociocultural dynamics in children's development. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

O'Malley, C. ( 1995). Designing computer support for collaborative learning. In C. O'Malley (Ed.), Computer supported collaborative learning. Berlin: Springer.

Teasley, S. D., Roschelle, J. ( 1993) Constructing a joint problem space: The computer as a tool for sharing knowledge. In: S. P. Lajoie and S. J. Derry (eds.) Computers as Cognitive Tools. Lawrence Erlbaum.

Vygotsky, L. ( 1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological functions. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Vygotsky, L. ( 1983). "The history of higher mental functions". In Collected Works. V. 3. Moscow: Pedagogika (in Russian, written in 1931).

Valsiner, J., van der R. Veer ( 1991). "The encoding of distance: The concept of the Zone of Proximal Development and its interpretations". In R. R. Cocking & K. A. Renninger (Eds.), The development and meaning of psychological distance. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.


Authors' Addresses

Victor Kaptelinin: Department of Informatics, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. vklinin@informatik.umu.se

Michael Cole: Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0092, USA cole@weber.ucsd.edu

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