Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview

DEVELOPING CULTURE OF INQUIRY IN COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Lasse Lipponen Department of Psychology University of Helsinki P.O. Box 13 SF-00014 University of Helsinki Finland Email:lasse.lipponen@helsinki.fi tel:+358-40-5563630 fax:+358-9-19123443

Kai Hakkarainen Department of Psychology University of Helsinki P.O. Box 13 SF-00014 University of Helsinki Finland Email:kai. hakkarainen@helsinki.fi tel: +358-50-5634248 fax: +358-9-19123443


ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study is to report results from an early stage of a longitudinal research on CSILE's (Computer-supported Intentional Learning Environments) cognitive effects in a Finnish elementary school. The study was aimed at analyzing how elementary school students' process of inquiry mediated by the CSILE environment developed from first (third grade) to second (fourth grade) year of CSILE use. The study was carried out by analyzing qualitatively 26 students' written productions in CSILE's database as well as by conducting some structured interviews. The study indicated that the students made a considerable progress in terms of explanation-seeking research questions, explanatory level of knowledge produced by them as well as quality of discourse interaction. However, at this point of time there were no indications of in-depth knowledge advancement that characterize the most successful Canadian CSILE classes. It is argued that facilitation of higher-level practices of inquiry in the context of the CSCL require a lot of pedagogical and epistemological support for both the teachers and students. It seems also to be important to engage a whole school community to the process of pedagogical development rather than deal with individual teachers and classrooms.


1. INTRODUCTION

The purpose to the study is to present results from an early stage of a four year longitudinal study focused on analyzing cognitive effects of computer-supported collaborative learning (the CSCL). The technological infrastructure of the study was provided by the Computer-supported Intentional Learning Environments (CSILE) developed by Scardamalia and Bereiter ( 1991). CSILE is a networked learning environment for fostering higher-level processes of inquiry in elementary-level education (see Scardamalia & Bereiter, 1994). CSILE provides students a shared space for working productively with knowledge. The system is used to organize students learning projects in the context of such domains of knowledge as mathematics, physics, biology, and history. CSILE fosters participation in research-like process of inquiry at school by engaging students in a process of generating their own research questions, setting up intuitive theories and searching scientific information as well as sharing their cognitive achievements.

CSILE provides an advanced technological infrastructure as well as well-articulated cognitive practices for the CSCL. However, it seems that in order to effectively exploit new technology-based learning environments and corresponding cognitive practices, more systematic research on constraints and

____________________
1
The present study is a part of the Educational Technology Project of Helsinki (Helsinki 2001 project) coordinated by the Finnish IT Center for Schools, Vantaa Institution for Continuing Education, University of Helsinki. Finnish research on the CSILE environment is based on a research agreement between the Centre for Applied Cognitive Science, Ontario Institution for Studies in Education and Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki.

-164-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.