Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview

technology. Other papers have described in some detail the role that computers played in making the Escher's World project work ( Shaffer 1997). Here what is most important is recognizing the design studio as a potential model for computer supported collaborative learning environments.

Perhaps most important, this research suggests that whatever model we take for supporting collaborative activities, students' experiences of collaboration are strongly influenced by their sense of control--or lack of control--over their learning process. Learning to work with others is an essential skill, particularly for the modem workplace. This work suggests that some care is needed in thinking about how create an environment where both collaboration and personal control of the learning process are given adequate support to help students master a domain like mathematics or design. The design studio may offer a model for one solution to this delicate balancing act.


References

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Kafai, Y., & Harel, I. ( 1991). "Learning through design and teaching: exploring social and collaborative aspects of constructionism." In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.

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