Policy-Making in the European Union

By Helen Wallace; William Wallace | Go to book overview

Policy-Making in the European Union

Fourth/Edition

Edited by

Helen Wallace and William Wallace

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

-iii-

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Policy-Making in the European Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Praise for the Third Edition v
  • Outline Contents vii
  • Detailed Contents ix
  • Preface xix
  • Appendices xxiii
  • Figures xxiv
  • Boxes xxv
  • Tables xxvi
  • Abbreviations xxviii
  • List of Contributors xxxiv
  • Editors' Note xxxv
  • Part I - Institutions, Process, and Analytelcal Approaches 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Institutional Setting Five Variations on a Theme 3
  • Contents 3
  • Further Reading 37
  • Chapter 2 - The Policy Process a Moving Pendulum 39
  • Contents 39
  • Further Reading 64
  • Chapter 3 - Analysing and Explaining Policies 65
  • Contents 65
  • Further Reading 80
  • Part II - Policies 83
  • Chapter 4 - The Single Market a New Approach to Policy 85
  • Contents 85
  • Notes 113
  • Further Reading 113
  • Chapter 5 - Competition Policy the Limits of the European Regulatory State 115
  • Contents 115
  • Notes 146
  • Further Reading 146
  • Chapter 6 - Economic and Monetary Union Poltical Coviction and Economic Uncertainty 149
  • Contents 149
  • Notes 177
  • Further Reading 178
  • Chapter 7 - The Common Agricultural Policy Politics against Markets 179
  • Contents 179
  • Notes 207
  • Further Reading 209
  • Chapter 8 - The Budget Who Gets What, When, and How 211
  • Contents 211
  • Notes 240
  • Further Reading 241
  • Chapter 9 - Cohesion and the Structural Funds Transfers and Trade-Offs 243
  • Contents 243
  • Notes 264
  • Further Reading 265
  • Chapter 10 - Social Policy Left to Courts and Markets? 267
  • Contents 267
  • Appendix 10.1 - The Development of Cases before the European Court of Justice, 1992-1998 289
  • Notes 290
  • Further Reading 292
  • Chapter 11 - Environmental Policy Economic Constraints and External Pressures 293
  • Contents 293
  • Further Reading 315
  • Chapter 12 - Biotechnology Policy Regulating Risks and Risking Regulation 317
  • Contents 317
  • Notes 341
  • Further Reading 342
  • Chapter 13 - The Common Fisheries Policy Letting the Little Ones Go? 345
  • Contents 345
  • Notes 371
  • Further Reading 371
  • Chapter 14 - European Trade Policy Global Pressures and Domestic Constraints 373
  • Contents 373
  • Notes 397
  • Further Reading 398
  • Chapter 15 - Trade with Developing Countries Banana Skins and Turf Wars 401
  • Contents 401
  • Notes 426
  • Further Reading 426
  • Chapter 16 - Eastern Enlargement Strategy or Second Thoughts? 427
  • Contents 427
  • Appendix 16.1 - Overview of Relations between the Ceecs and the Eu and Nato 458
  • Notes 459
  • Further Reading 460
  • Chapter 17 - Common Foreign and Security Policy from Shadow to Substance? 461
  • Contents 461
  • Notes 491
  • Further Reading 491
  • Chapter 18 - Justice and Home Affairs Integration through Incrementalism? 493
  • Contents 493
  • Notes 519
  • Further Reading 519
  • Part III - Conclusions 521
  • Chapter 19 - Collective Governance the Eu Political Process 523
  • Contents 523
  • Notes 542
  • References 543
  • Index 589
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