Pride and Prejudice: School Desegregation and Urban Renewal in Norfolk, 1950-1959

By Forrest R. White | Go to book overview

10
Conclusion

Although the United States Supreme Court's decision in the Brown v. Board of Education cases sent shock waves of protest across most of the South, only the extent of the decree actually came as a surprise those who were charged with the planning and leadership of Southern cities. That some sort of decision from the Court overruling a portion of the South's elaborate system of segregated education was a foregone conclusion among many in leadership roles; clearly the "separate but equal" facilities maintained by communities, particularly those in rural areas, were so far from equivalent that only the most callous court could disregard the distinction. Moreover, desegregation had already begun in the nation's military, transportation, public accommodation, and recreational facilities, either through administrative action or legal intervention, and it was hard to imagine that a nation that had so recently fought repression overseas would allow its own schools to remain as the last bastion of racial subjugation at home. The main thesis of this work is that the individuals charged with the leadership and management of Southern cities had ample time, plenty of opportunity, and strong

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Pride and Prejudice: School Desegregation and Urban Renewal in Norfolk, 1950-1959
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Prologue: Norfolk Before 1950 xix
  • 1- Planning the New Norfolk xxvii
  • 2- Premonitions of Crisis 35
  • 3- First Reactions to Brown 57
  • 4- The Bulldozer Era 85
  • 5- Redevelopment Rationales 121
  • 6- Prelude to Confrontation 151
  • 7- In Pursuit of a Mandate 175
  • 8- A Very Massive Resister 199
  • 9- A Second School Crisis 231
  • 10- Conclusion 245
  • Abbreviations 301
  • Glossary 303
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 345
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