Strategic Interpersonal Communication

By John A. Daly; John M. Wiemann | Go to book overview

sort of observer-performer discrepancy in assessments of communication anxiety or arousal ( Sparks & Greene, 1992; but see Burgoon & LePoire, 1992). And attached to these dissimilar assessments of self-control are other important assessments, for example, level of communicative or intellectual competence. Thus, in the situation just described, the communicator may judge himself or herself as low in competence, whereas the observers of his or her performance may believe that he or she performed competently and may even infer that he or she has a "competent" personality.

An important implication is that researchers and theorists should be clear about the kind of control that is of interest to them. The data source for testing hypotheses regarding communication control does not present itself neutrally for examination. Predictions about relationships between communication and control that hold for one data source may not generalize to others.


REFERENCES

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Asch S. ( 1951). "Effects of group pressure upon the modification and distortion of judgment". In M. H. Guetzkow (Ed.), Groups, leadership, and men (pp. 117-190). Pittsburgh, PA: Carnegie.

Baumeister R. F. ( 1982). "A self-presentational view of social phenomena". Psychological Bulletin, 91, 3-26.

Berger C. R., & Bradac J. J. ( 1982). Language and social knowledge: Uncertainty in interpersonal relations. London: Edward Arnold.

Bettinghaus E. P., & Cody M. J. ( 1987). Persuasive communication ( 4th ed.). New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Bowers J. W. ( 1974). "Guest editor's introduction: Beyond threats and promises". Communication Monographs, 41, iv-vi.

Bradac J. J. ( 1983). "The language of lovers, flovers, and friends: Communication in social and personal relationships". Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 2, 141-163.

Bradac J. J. ( 1990). "Language attitudes and impression formation". In H. Giles & W. P. Robinson (Eds.), Handbook of language and social psychology (pp. 387-412). Chichester, England: Wiley.

Bradac J. J., Hemphill M. R., & Tardy C. H. ( 1981). "Language style on trial: Effects of powerful and powerless speech upon judgments of victims and villains". Western Journal of Speech Communication, 45, 327-341.

Bradac J. J., Martin L. W., Elliott N. D., & Tardy C. H. ( 1980). "On the neglected side of linguistic science: Multivariate studies of sentence judgment". Linguistics: An Interdisciplinary Journal of the Language Sciences, 18, 967-995.

Bradac J. J., & Mulac A. ( 1984a). "A molecular view of powerful and powerless speech styles: Attributional consequences of specific language features and communicator intentions". Communication Monographs, 51, 306-319.

Bradac J. J., & Mulac A. ( 1984b). "Attributional consequences of powerful and powerless speech styles in a crisis-intervention context". Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 3, 1-19.

Bradac J. J., & Street R. L., Jr. ( 1989/ 1990). "Powerful and powerless styles of talk: A theoretical analysis of language and impression formation". Research on Language and Social Interaction, 23, 195-242.

Bradac J. J., Tardy C. H., & Hosman L. A. ( 1980). "Disclosure styles and a hint at their genesis". Human Communication Research, 6, 228-238.

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