The Papal Monarchy: The Western Church from 1050 to 1250

By Colin Morris | Go to book overview

15
THE FORMULATION OF THE FAITH

i. The Growth of Theology

The years after 1050, and still more after 1100, saw an immense increase in the discussion of the Christian faith. After a period of almost two centuries in which there had been little theological writing its volume grew to be greater than at any previous time, and its importance to be unequalled since the fourth and fifth centuries. The shape of later medieval Catholic belief, and hence the Protestant and post-Tridentine systems which arose from it, rested upon foundations laid by the theologians of the twelfth century. Matters of doctrine became the subject of interest in streets and market-places. The anxiety of officialdom to silence the teaching of Berengar of Tours about the eucharist reflected the concern that the question 'has so filled the land that not only clerks and monks, whose office it is to concern themselves with such matters, but also the very laity discuss it in the streets'. At much the same time Peter Damian was expressing his dismay that peasants were arguing (in front of women, too) about the teaching of Scripture, and later Bernard of Clairvaux complained that discussions were going on in front of the general public in towns, villages, and castles.1 Scholars were respectful of the teaching of the Fathers, but they were also conscious of their own originality, so that Abbot Rupert of Deutz -- a conservative in his general approach to the subject -- could claim that 'the broad field of the Holy Scriptures is common to all the confessors of Christ, and the liberty to discuss them cannot rightly be denied to anyone as long as, subject to the faith, he dictates or writes what he thinks'.2 Confidence in the new studies was expressed in the idea that the learning which once found its home in Greece and Rome had now come to France, and Otto of Freising thought that

____________________
1
M. R. James, Catalogue of Manuscripts of Aberdeen ( Cambridge, 1932), 36; Peter Damian, ep. v. 1 (PL 144.337AB); letter of French bishops in Bernard ep. 337 (PL 182-540C).
2
Rupert, In Apocalypsim, prol. (PL 169.827-8).

-358-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Papal Monarchy: The Western Church from 1050 to 1250
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 673

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.