Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838- 1839

By Frances Anne Kemble; John A. Scott | Go to book overview

II Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina

[ Butler Island. January, 1839]

Dearest Harriet,1

On Friday morning [ December 21, 1838 ] we started from Philadelphia, by railroad, for Baltimore. It is a curious fact enough, that half the routes that are traveled in America are either temporary or unfinished--one reason, among several, for the multitudinous accidents which befall wayfarers. At the very outset of our journey, and within scarce a mile of Philadelphia, we crossed the Schuylkill, over a bridge, one of the principal piers of which

____________________
1
The content of this chapter and the following one was written by Mrs. Kemble while on Butler Island, and formed part of her correspondence with a lifelong friend, Harriet St. Leger. But it was not included in the original edition of the Journal. It has been thought well to incorporate these letters here since they give a vivid picture of the journey from Philadelphia to Georgia in late December 1838; and because they effectively fill the gap that would otherwise exist between the first chapter of the Journal and the succeeding ones. These' letters were originally published in Frances Kemble : Records of Later Life ( London: 1882), 1, 170-218. A series of dots in the text indicates material deleted by Mrs. Kemble herself in preparing the manuscript for publication. The beginning of each new day throughout the voyage has been indicated by the addition of the appropriate date in brackets.

-12-

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