Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838- 1839

By Frances Anne Kemble; John A. Scott | Go to book overview

VII
Roswell King, Jr.

[ January, 1839]

Dearest E[lizabeth],

After finishing my last letter to you, I went out into the clear starlight to breathe the delicious mildness of the air, and was surprised to hear, rising from one of the houses of the settlement, a hymn sung apparently by a number of voices. The next morning I inquired the meaning of this, and was informed that those Negroes on the plantation who were members of the Church were holding a prayer meeting. There is an immensely strong devotional feeling among these poor people. The worst of it is, that it is zeal without understanding, and profits them but little; yet light is light, even that poor portion that may stream through a keyhole, and I welcome this most ignorant profession of religion in Mr. [ Butler ]'s dependents as the herald of better and brighter things for them. Some of the planters are entirely inimical to any such proceedings, and neither allow their Negroes to attend worship, or to congregate together for religious purposes, and truly I think they are wise in their own generation. On other plantations, again, the same rigid discipline is not observed; and some planters and overseers go even farther than toleration, and encourage these devotional exercises and professions of religion, having actually dis

-106-

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Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838- 1839
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • General Table of Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Editor's Introduction ix
  • Title Page lxiii
  • Preface lxvii
  • Contents lxix
  • From Philadelphia To Georgia. December 1838 1
  • I - Thoughts on Slavery 3
  • II- Maryland, Virginia, And North Carolina 12
  • III - Charleston And the Sea-Island Coast 32
  • Butler Island. December 30, 1838- February 16, 1839 51
  • IV - Exploring Butler Island 53
  • V - Further Explorations 74
  • VI- Observations Upon Mr. Butler's Slaves 89
  • VII - Roswell King, Jr. 106
  • VIII - Sinda 115
  • IX- Slave Settlements 120
  • X - Psyche 132
  • XI - Shadrach's Death and Funeral 141
  • XIII - Three Days of Plantation Life 158
  • XIV - Visitors 172
  • XV - The Pine Barrens 179
  • XVI - The Move to St. Simons Island 187
  • St. Simons Island. February 16- April 19, 1839 197
  • XVII - Hampton Point 199
  • XVIII - A Furious Wind and Sea 205
  • XIX - Women in Slavery 214
  • XX - Sally, Auber, and Judy 232
  • XXI - No Trace of Pity 240
  • XXII - Visitors and Petitioners 243
  • XXIII - Visits to the Old and Sick 254
  • XXIV 259
  • XXV - Rides and Visits 265
  • XXVI - Broughton Island And Hamilton Estate 278
  • XXVII - A Planter Feud 290
  • XXVIII - Rides and Visits 297
  • XXIX - Christ Church 307
  • XXX - Rides and Visits 316
  • XXXI - A Conversation With John Couper 321
  • XXXII - A Fatal Encounter 325
  • XXXIII - The Wreck of the Pulaski 330
  • Appendixes 345
  • Editor's Appendixes 385
  • Index 417
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