Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838- 1839

By Frances Anne Kemble; John A. Scott | Go to book overview

XX
Sally, Auber, and Judy

[ March 3-4, 1839]

Dearest E[lizabeth],

When I told you in my last letter of the encroachments which the waters of the Altamaha are daily making on the bank at Hampton Point and immediately in front of the imposing-looking old dwelling of the former master, I had no idea how rapid this crumbling process has been of late years; but today, standing there with Mrs. G[owen], whom I had gone to consult about the assistance we might render to some of the poor creatures whose cases I sent you in my last letter, she told me that within the memory of many of the slaves now living on the plantation, a grove of orange trees had spread its fragrance and beauty between the house and the river. Not a vestige remains of them. The earth that bore them was gradually undermined, slipped, and sank down into the devouring flood; and when she saw the astonished incredulity of my look, she led me to the ragged and broken bank, and there, immediately below it, and just covered by the turbid waters of the inrushing tide, were the heads of the poor drowned orange trees, swaying like black twigs in the briny flood, which had not yet dislodged all of them from their hold upon the soil which had gone down beneath the water wearing its garland of bridal blossom.

-232-

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Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838- 1839
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • General Table of Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Editor's Introduction ix
  • Title Page lxiii
  • Preface lxvii
  • Contents lxix
  • From Philadelphia To Georgia. December 1838 1
  • I - Thoughts on Slavery 3
  • II- Maryland, Virginia, And North Carolina 12
  • III - Charleston And the Sea-Island Coast 32
  • Butler Island. December 30, 1838- February 16, 1839 51
  • IV - Exploring Butler Island 53
  • V - Further Explorations 74
  • VI- Observations Upon Mr. Butler's Slaves 89
  • VII - Roswell King, Jr. 106
  • VIII - Sinda 115
  • IX- Slave Settlements 120
  • X - Psyche 132
  • XI - Shadrach's Death and Funeral 141
  • XIII - Three Days of Plantation Life 158
  • XIV - Visitors 172
  • XV - The Pine Barrens 179
  • XVI - The Move to St. Simons Island 187
  • St. Simons Island. February 16- April 19, 1839 197
  • XVII - Hampton Point 199
  • XVIII - A Furious Wind and Sea 205
  • XIX - Women in Slavery 214
  • XX - Sally, Auber, and Judy 232
  • XXI - No Trace of Pity 240
  • XXII - Visitors and Petitioners 243
  • XXIII - Visits to the Old and Sick 254
  • XXIV 259
  • XXV - Rides and Visits 265
  • XXVI - Broughton Island And Hamilton Estate 278
  • XXVII - A Planter Feud 290
  • XXVIII - Rides and Visits 297
  • XXIX - Christ Church 307
  • XXX - Rides and Visits 316
  • XXXI - A Conversation With John Couper 321
  • XXXII - A Fatal Encounter 325
  • XXXIII - The Wreck of the Pulaski 330
  • Appendixes 345
  • Editor's Appendixes 385
  • Index 417
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