Competitive Communication: A Rhetoric for Modern Business

By Barry Eckhouse | Go to book overview
INDEX
Abbreviations, misuse of, 160-161
Abstraction, 150-153
ladder of, 56-58, 150-151
Abuse of the arguer (argumentum ad hominem), 111
Active construction, 173-174
in claims, 45-46, 69
computer-assisted text analysis and, 209, 219, 220
in main reason, 48, 70
Adverbs
hidden, 141-142, 144
misplacement of, 178-179
redundancy and, 134-135
Affect, misuse of, 156
Agency (who questions), 82, 83, 88
Aggravated, misuse of, 156-157
Agreement
collective nouns and, 196-197
company names and, 196
compound subjects and, 197-198
correlatives and, 198
noun and pronoun, 195-196
problem expressions and, 198-199
subject and verb, 193-195
Algorithms, in computer-assisted text analysis, 210, 213
Although, misuse of, 166
American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, The, 154, 155
Ami Pro, 211, 212, 215, 216, 222n1
Among
case and, 201
misuse of, 158
Analogy, 98
false, 105-106
for punctuation, 182-183
Ancient Greece, 3-4
Anxious, misuse of, 157
Apostrophes, 199
Appeal to ignorance (argumentum ad ignorantiam), 108-110
Appeal to pity (argumentum ad misericordiam), 110; see alsoPathos
Argument, 6-7, 41-60, 61-75; see also Assumptions; Claims; Ethical argument; Fallacies; Main reason; Opposition; Rebuttals
ethos and, 121
as inquiry, 63-64
movement of, 65, 66
negative connotation of, 43-44
as persuasion, 42, 44
principle of exchange in, 44, 49
sample documents illustrating, 237-265
Argurnentum ad hominem, 106
abuse of the arguer, 111
circumstances of the arguer, 111-112
Argumentum ad ignorantiam, 108-110
Argumentum ad invidiam, 106-107, 112-115
Argumentum ad misericordiam, 110
Argumentum ad populum, 102-103
Argumentum ad verecundiam, 98-100, 112-115, 121
Aristotle, xii, 7, 96, 120, 121-122, 123, 130n12, 132
Arrangement, 5
organization and, 28-30
Ars Dictaminis, 4
Artificial Linguistics, Inc., 208
Associated Press Style Book and Libel Manual, 155
Assumed authority (argumentum ad verecundiam), 98-100, 112-115,121
Assumed causal connection (post hoc ergo propter hoc), 96, 100-102
Assumed specifics, 53, 55-59
Assumptions, 49
in appeal to ignorance, 109
backing for. SeeBacking
constructing, 70-71
judging, 50-52
opposition to, 64, 66, 67
rebuttal of, 72
Assure, misuse of, 157-158
Audience-oriented communication, 21
Autocratic management style, 42-43, 98
Backing, 64, 65, 67, 72
constructing, 71
Baker, Russell, 154
Balance, principle of, 32, 35-36
Barzun, Jacques, 154
Because, misuse of, 158
Begging the question (petitio principii), 53, 98, 112-115
Bell Laboratories, 206, 207, 213
Bernstein, Theodore, 195
Between
case and, 201
misuse of, 158
Body (of paper), 34-38
Bond, Julian, 154
Booth, Wayne, 98
Brevitas, 6, 8

-283-

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