Cold War Fugitive: A Personal Story of the McCarthy Years

By Gil Green | Go to book overview

COLD WAR FUGITIVE

A PERSONAL STORY OF THE McCARTHY YEARS BY GIL GREEN

INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHERS, New York

-iii-

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Cold War Fugitive: A Personal Story of the McCarthy Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • I--Gathering Storm xii
  • 1 - Grim News 1
  • 2 - A Flight Backward in Time 6
  • 3 - Soapbox Thespians 11
  • 4 - Hired and Fired 18
  • 5 - What J. Edgar Hoover Wanted 25
  • 6 - Our Day in Court 29
  • 7 - Family Reverberations 37
  • 8 - To Tell the Truth 42
  • 9 - Visiting the USSR 48
  • 10 - Comintern 51
  • 11 - Guilty! 53
  • II- Fugitive! 64
  • 1 - Getting Away 65
  • 2 - The Hunt Begins 69
  • 3 - Sanctuary 72
  • 4 - Family is Target 77
  • 5 - Dry Cleaning and Cosmetic Change 83
  • 6 - Women, Children First 91
  • 7 - Guilt by Kinship 94
  • 8 - Kidnapped in Mexico 96
  • 9 - Fugitives Get Organized 103
  • 10 - Toothless Rufus 108
  • 11 - Grim and Farcical 111
  • 12 - "Informants of Known Reliability" 114
  • 13 - Underground at Work 117
  • 14 - Paul Robeson in Peoria 122
  • 15 - Two Must Die 124
  • 16 - Guatemalan Hide-Out 128
  • 17 - Connecticut to High Sierras 131
  • 18 - "Have You No Sense of Decency, Sir?" 135
  • 19 - Closing out 139
  • 20 - An Obsession 146
  • 21 - Back to Foley Square 151
  • III- Leavenworth 162
  • 1 - West Street Again 163
  • 2 - Enroute to the Big House 169
  • 3 - Did They Really Know? 174
  • 4 - Quarantine 179
  • 5 - Cellhouse A 186
  • 6 - The Yard 193
  • 7 - Pinpricks 196
  • 8 - Mccarthyism Again 201
  • 9 - Holiday Cheer 206
  • 10 - Crime and Punishment 208
  • 11 - Bank-Robber Friend 211
  • 12 - Strike! 215
  • 13 - A Brahmin and an Untouchable 218
  • 14 - Battle of Broken Knee 223
  • 15 - Convict Labor 228
  • 16 - Puerto Rico Libre 232
  • 17 - Segregation 238
  • 18 - Bad News from Terre Haute 243
  • 19 - To Shorten My Time 247
  • 20 - Jailhouse Intellectuals 255
  • 21 - No. 73-335 is Released 261
  • Index 271
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