Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible

By Karl H. Pribram | Go to book overview

of human language use.

Finally, the great gulf between research with humans and nonhumans has its basis in religious and humanistic philosophies that set humans apart from other animals in ways that are convenient for our purposes. Certainly, important differences exist that should not be underestimated. But, perhaps in an effort to justify our superiority over other life forms, we have tended to ignore or even deny many important similarities. While this denial is self serving, it is not becoming of the image we have of ourselves as objective scientist. A better appreciation of the similarities between us and other animals can only benefit our attempt to understand our own capacities and limitations.


Author Notes

The research described in this chapter was supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grants MH 35376 and MH 45979, and by National Science Foundation Grants BNS 8418275, RII 8902792, BNS 9019080, and IBN 9414589. Important contributions to the research were provided by Peter J. Urcuioli, David E. Hogan, Charles A. Edwards, Joyce A. Jagielo, Pamela Jackson-Smith, Janice N. Steirn, Lou M. Sherburne, Karen L. Roper, and Daren H. Kaiser.


References

Akins, C., & Zentall T. R. (in press). "Imitative learning in Japanese quail: (Coturnix japonica)using the two-action method". Journal of Comparative Psychology.

Astley, S. L., & Wasserman, E. A. ( 1996). "Mediating associations, essentialism, and nonsimilarity-based categorization". In T. R. Zentall & P. M. Smeets (Eds.), Stimulus class formation in humans and animals (pp. 111-136). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Berlin, B., & Kay, P. ( 1969). Basic color terms: Their universality and evolution. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Blough, D. S. ( 1959). "Delayed matching in the pigeon". Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 2, 151-160.

Cerella, J. ( 1979). "Visual classes and natural categories in the pigeon". Human Perception and Performance, 5, 68-77.

Cumming, W. W., & Berryman, R. ( 1961). "Some data on matching behavior in the pigeon". Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 4, 281-284.

Dawson, B. V. & Foss, B. M. ( 1965). "Observational learning in budgerigars". Animal Behaviour, 13, 470-474.

Edwards, C. A., Jagielo, J. A., & Zentall, T. R. ( 1983). "Same/different symbol use by pigeons". Animal Learning and Behavior, 11, 349-355.

Estes, W. K. ( 1950). "Toward a statistical theory of learning". Psychological Review, 57, 94- 107.

Farthing, G. W., Wagner, J. W. Gilmour, S., & Waxman, H. M. ( 1977). "Short-term memory and information processing in pigeons". Learning and Motivation, 8, 520-532.

Galef, B. J., Jr. ( 1988). "Imitation in animals: History, definition, and interpretation of data from the psychological laboratory". In T. R. Zentall & B. G. Galef, Jr. (Eds.), Social learning: Psychological and biological perspectives (pp. 3-28). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 568

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.