Political Tactics

By Michael James; Cyprian Blamires et al. | Go to book overview

only two lists, or two ballots--the one for the ayes, the other for the noes; I would establish a third, for the neuters.+

But it may be asked, why require a man to vote, whilst he is permitted to give a vote which will have effect neither on the one side nor the other?

It is replied, that a neuter vote subjects the individual who gives it to the judgment of public opinion. By abstaining from voting, he may escape observation, or he may excuse himself upon divers grounds. But admit a neuter vote+ in a case in which the public interest is manifest, the voter cannot withdraw himself from censure--it will exhibit either his crime or his incapacity in as clear a manner as if he had decidedly taken the wrong side.

In cases which admit of honest doubts, the number of neuter votes would serve to enlighten the assembly, by showing that its deliberations had not yet reached maturity.a


CHAPTER XV. OF COMMITTEES.

§1. Of Special Committees.

THE more numerous an assembly is, the less is it fitted for certain labours. By dividing itself into committees, it multiplies itself--it resolves itself into many parts, each one of which is better calculated to attain a certain object than the whole body would be.

Each committee may be engaged with a different matter. The labour is distributed--progress is accelerated--a degree of attention may be given to all the details of each new project, of which a large assembly would be incapable. This formation of committees, or bureaux,+ is absolutely necessary for the collection of documents--for engaging in those preparatory researches which require that a great number of persons should be heard--for the verification of accounts,--&c. &c.

It is there frequently that the preparation of a law is completed--a species of labour, for which a large assembly is very ill adapted, and which, if attempted in such an assembly, would be attended with a considerable loss of time.

____________________
a
It would seem that this form, very applicable to facts, is less so to the making of laws. He who is undecided ought to be for the negative, for he sees no sufficient reason for making the law.

If doubtful, wait,+--is more applicable to matters of legislation than to any others.

Should the neuters+ be the greater number, what ought to be done? Ought not indecision in this case to have the force of a negative?

In a general committee, the neuter vote might be admitted for the purpose of better judging whether the deliberation ought to be continued or adjourned: but it is not necessary: the motion for adjournment supplies its place. All who are undecided have only to support it,+ in order to obtain leisure for the acquisition of new information.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Tactics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.