Sexual Cultures and Migration in the Era of AIDS: Anthropological and Demographic Perspectives

By Gilbert Herdt | Go to book overview

9 Homophobia and the Ethnoscape of Sex Work in Rio de Janeiro

PATRICK LARVIE


Urban Ethnoscapes: The 'Red Light' Districts of Rio de Janeiro

The ethnographic 'scene' of cosmopolitan urban centres like Rio de Janeiro is perhaps characterized more by the rapidity of social change, the physical movement of people, and constant shifts in the directions and modalities of cultural, political, and ethnic affiliation than by anything else. Exactly what constitutes the object of study for ethnographers interested in 'culture', 'subcultures', or 'local' knowledge becomes increasingly difficult to define and operationalize in such contexts. The application of ethnographic methodologies to the study of populations in movement necessarily requires a redefinition of some basic concepts in anthropology ( Appadurai, 1990, 1991; Abu-Lughod, 1990, 1991). Ethnographic research in urban areas must take into account the scales of distance and speed at which change occurs without losing sight of the social and cultural institutions which serve to ground these shifts in the activities of everyday life. The 'red light' districts of Rio de Janeiro are linked to globalized systems of commerce and migration and at the same time they are embedded within the institutions of urban life in Brazil. In the case of male sex workers, homophobia is one of the cultural elements which links social and physical spaces, structuring movement between and within them. Sex workers in Rio de Janeiro live and work in a space which is bounded as much by social and cultural practices that traverse national boundaries as by demarcations of neighbourhoods, cities, or countries. This essay will address the relationship of individual sex workers, male prostitutes in the cases I will examine, with a complex of cultural systems which simultaneously instigates and curtails their movement both within and across national borders.

Appadurai has used the term ethnoscape to refer to the'... landscape of persons who make up the shifting world in which we live: tourists, immigrants, refugees, exiles, guests workers, and other moving groups and persons [which] constitute an essential feature of the world...' ( 1991: 192). The sex industries of the world's major metropolitan centres, especially those which are destinations for both tourists and business travellers, present complicated and important cases for understanding the impact of global processes on local social and cultural institutions. Such theoretical work is necessary for understanding what, if any, importance these nodes of commercialized sex have with respect to the current AIDS pandemic. If

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sexual Cultures and Migration in the Era of AIDS: Anthropological and Demographic Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.