Sexual Cultures and Migration in the Era of AIDS: Anthropological and Demographic Perspectives

By Gilbert Herdt | Go to book overview

12 Sexual Networking, Use of Condoms, and Perception of STDs and HIV/AIDS Transmission Among Migrant Sex Workers in Lagos, Nigeria

I. O. ORUBULOYE

Across Nigeria, attitudes towards female sexuality vary among ethnic and religious groups. Some ethnic and religious groups are punitive in their pursuit of even discreet female sexual transgressions, while male sexual transgressions have always been taken for granted. In certain parts of Nigeria, women have some degree of freedom and a substantial degree of equality with men, while in some parts, especially in the north, where the majority are Muslims, the society suppresses and closets its women. Similarly, premarital chastity has traditionally been rigidly enforced among some ethnic and religious groups, while in others the society has traditionally been flexible. These differences lead to variations in sexual patterns and they are likely to cause differences in the risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and AIDS.

The nature and structure of the traditional family system are also important determinants of patterns of sexual relations within and outside marriage. Polygyny on the scale still found in Nigeria has been sustained only by the very substantial delay of male first marriage. It has inevitably produced a situation where half of adult males are single and sexually active. On the other hand, polygyny has taught men to believe that relations with only one woman are not part of man's nature, while postpartum abstinence makes women unavailable for sex for a considerable part of their reproductive life span. During the long period of postpartum abstinence men look for partners elsewhere. A significant proportion of their sex needs is met by commercial sex workers, divorced women, and widows.

The current economic difficulties arising from the collapse of high export prices for petroleum and the structural adjustment programme adopted to meet the difficulties created by the end of the oil boom have had an impact on sexual practices. The prosperous oil boom years began after the Nigerian civil war in 1970 and finally collapsed with the 1987 floating of the Naira (the Nigerian currency unit worth US$1 before the float and less than five US cents at the time of the research reported here).

The commercial sex workers' study is part of the on-going research on sexual networking, STDs, and HIV/AIDS transmission at the Ondo State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria, and is supported by a grant from the Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries (SAREC).

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sexual Cultures and Migration in the Era of AIDS: Anthropological and Demographic Perspectives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.