We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People

By Civil Rights Congress | Go to book overview

The Law and the Indictment

SHOCKED by the Nazis' barbaric murder of millions of Jews and millions of Poles, Russians, Czechs and other nationals on the sole basis of "race" under Hitler's law -- just as Negroes are murdered on the basis of "race" in the United States under Mississippi, Virginia and Georgia law -- the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the Genocide Convention on December 9, 1948.


Why the Genocide Convention Was Passed

The Convention, to a marked degree, is a result of the Nuremberg trials of the Nazi war criminals at the conclusion of World War II. The trial, according to Supreme Court Justice Robert H. Jackson of the United States, then a special prosecutor of the Nazi criminals, indicated that domestic genocide in time of peace has an inevitable tendency to the greater genocide of war. Indeed he declared in his opening statement that the first was preparation for the latter. This domestic genocide, Mr. Jackson asserted, was the foundation of predatory war and the prelude to the larger genocide that followed against the nationals of other countries, a genocide seeking the political and economic control of Europe, if not the world, as the previous domestic genocide had secured it in Germany.

As Justice Jackson said in his opening statement at the Nuremberg trial:

"How a government treats its own inhabitants generally is thought to be no concern of other governments or of international society. Certainly few oppressions or cruelties would warrant the intervention of foreign powers. But the German mistreatment of Germans is now known to pass in magnitude and savagery any limits of what is tolerable by modern civilization. Other nations by silence would take a consenting part in such crimes. These Nazi persecutions, moreover, take character as international crimes because of the purpose for which they were undertaken. If aggressive warfare in vio

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We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Foreword to New Edition vii
  • Article II, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide xii
  • Contents xiii
  • The Petitioners xvii
  • Part I - The Opening Statement 1
  • To the General Assembly of the United Nations 3
  • Part II - The Law and the Indictment 29
  • The Law and the Indictment 31
  • Part III - The Evidence 55
  • The Evidence 57
  • Part IV - Summary and Prayer 193
  • Summary and Prayer 195
  • Part V - Appendix 199
  • Selected Bibliography 238
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