We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People

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The Evidence

ALTHOUGH we believe the evidence tabulated below proves our case, we appeal to the General Assembly not as a court of law, which it is not, but as the conscience of mankind which it should be. We appeal not to the legal sense of mankind but to its common sense. When a crime is manifestly and overwhelmingly true, known to history and notorious to the world, that fact itself becomes part of the evidence before the General Assembly.

Similarly, although we cannot list it below as part of our evidence, we believe that the knowledge gained through the observation and the sense of every delegate to the General Assembly is in reality a part of our proof. Any delegate who has visited the capital of the United States at Washington, D.C., governed directly by the central government without benefit of local authority, knows of his own knowledge that segregation and oppression in violation of the Charter and the Convention is the policy and creature of the Government of the United States. Its scope and extent in the nation's capital has been attested to by a committee created by President Harry S. Truman in a document entitled, "To Secure These Rights." One of the most eminent officials of the United Nations, Dr. Ralph Bunche, has openly rejected a high post in his own government's State Department because of the inhuman segregation in the capital.

Although our evidence voluminously details the crimes of genocide suffered by the Negro people, it falls far short of adequately presenting reality. The crimes presented are only those experienced by some of the petitioners and that marked minority of crimes committed which happened to receive mention in Negro yearbooks, the Negro press or the labor press. The vast majority of such crimes are never recorded. This widespread failure to record crimes against the Negro people is in itself an index to genocide. Those cases included below appeared in the

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