Kids, Brains & Learning: What Goes Wrong--Prevention and Treatment

By Ray C. Wunderlich | Go to book overview

appendix c
PREVENTION
of ALLERGY

Those families with a history of allergy in the immediate family should be concerned with the following measures to minimize or prevent allergy in their children. Those families who have allergy on both sides of the family should be especially interested in these preventive measures.

Amount (quantity) counts in the production and prevention of allergy: More of something, by and large, produces allergy sooner than less of something.

During pregnancy it is wise to avoid excessive eating of citrus, wheat, eggs, and possibly cow's milk. However, careful attention must be paid to replacement of these items with suitable foods for nutritional sufficiency. It does little good to deplete the diet and produce a malnourished fetus in order to prevent allergy. Consultation with physician and/or dietition may allow an adequate diet without heavy food allergy risk. It is not wise to diet strictly; it is wise to avoid excesses of the foods mentioned.

During infancy, the use of low-allergy milks (goat's milk, soybean milk, protein hydrolysate, or human breast milk) is recommended for infants who are at a high risk for allergy (see Table 14). Late introduction of solid foods and holding food quantities down to reasonable amounts is advisable. Avoidance of

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Kids, Brains & Learning: What Goes Wrong--Prevention and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • I - The Problem of Brain Injury 1
  • II - Learning and Its Disorders 71
  • III - Perception 149
  • IV - Lessons from the Past 175
  • V Building Blocks 227
  • VI - Matters of Structure 285
  • VII - School Daze 317
  • VIII - Increasing Potential 363
  • IX - Systems of Treatment 441
  • X - Conclusion 507
  • Appendix A - Procedures for School Vision Screening 511
  • Appendix B - Physical Education and Movement Literature 515
  • Appendix C - Prevention of Allergy 517
  • Meet the Author 521
  • Index 523
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