The Mind of the Middle Ages, A.D. 200-1500: An Historical Survey

By Frederick B. Artz | Go to book overview

Index
NOTE: Of a number of references to the same subject the more important are shown in bold face.
Abbāsids, 143
Abelard, 112, 159, 182, 197, 200, 231, 257- 259, 262, 286, 315, 331, 372, 422, 447, 476
Abraham, 44, 49, 83, 89, 135, 137
Acton, 265-266
Adam de la Halle, 360, 413
Adams, Henry, 494
Adelard of Bath, 238
Aegidius Colonna, 294
Aelfric, 210
Aeneid. See Virgil
Aeschylus, 118, 181
Agricola, 312, 429
Alanus de Insulis, 376-378
Albert of Saxony, 247
Albert, Leon Batista, 404-405, 406
Albertus Magnus, 237, 241, 258, 261, 262- 263, 315, 425, 448, 490
Albigensians, 230, 337, 424
alchemy: Islamic, 164-167, 169, see also science; Latin Christian, 237, 240-241, see also science
Alcuin, 73, 180, 195-196, 204, 472
Alexander of Hales, 261, 490
Alexander the Great, 5, 16, 20
Alexander de Villa Dei, 308, 433-434
Alexandria, 27, 48, 66, 69, 72, 77, 88, 90, 93, 104, 110, 142, 151, 152, 202, 314
Alfonso the Wise, 243
Alfred the Great, 187, 188, 198, 210, 213, 222
Alhazen, 167-168
allegory. See symbolism
alliteration, 204, 207, 211, 322, 327, 348, 351
Almagest, 167, 169, 239, 311
Amadis of Gaul, 352
Ambrose, St., 65, 67, 73, 78-79, 81, 86, 87, 93, 201, 275, 283, 426, 444
Amos, 42
Anaximander, 7
Anaxagoras, 10, 13
Andreas Capellanus, 182, 337-338Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 210, 213
Anglo-Saxon poems, 207-210
animism, 4-5
Anna Comnena, 115
Anselm, 197, 212, 254, 256-257, 284, 367, 422, 447, 476, 490
Anthony, St., 30, 36, 73, 104, 116, 213, 364, 464
Apocalypse, 52-53, 65
Apocrypha, 44, 53, 458
Apologists, 68-69
Apollinaris Sidonius, 200, 202
Aquinas, St. Thomas, 51, 72, 73, 75, 112, 147, 159, 241, 243, 247, 258, 260, 261, 262, 263-269b, 269e, 269f, 288-293, 297, 315, 318, 332, 382, 395, 397, 425, 429, 440, 448, 478-479, 490
arabesque, 173-174
Arabia, 133, 134, 142, 144, 148, 170
Arabian Nights, 97, 171, 176, 469
Archimedes, 163
architecture. See art
Arianism, 72-73, 78, 79, 100, 190
Ariosto, Ludovico, 353, 354
Aristophanes, 11, 181
Aristotle, 9, 12, 16-20, 57, 75, 78, 96, 112158, 159, 160, 162, 163, 164, 165, 167, 169, 181, 182, 187, 188, 189, 234, 239, 245, 247, 253, 254, 258, 260, 261, 262, 266, 271, 274, 286, 287, 288, 289, 291, 292, 298, 299, 309, 311, 312, 313, 317, 377, 434, 437, 440, 457, 477
Aristotelianism, 16-20, 26, 28, 48, 75, 78, 157-158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 165, 167, 169, 181, 182, 234, 235, 238-239, 240, 253, 257, 258, 261, 263, 266, 267, 270, 271, 274, 287, 288, 289, 291, 294, 298, 309, 311
Arnold, Matthew, 365, 383
ars dictandi, 309, 434
ars nuova, 413-414
art, Late Roman, 88-89, 216, 385, 391; Early Christian, 87-92, 119, 462; Byzantine, 87-88, 119-128, 215, 216, 384, 388, 390, 391, 396, 403, 465; Islamic, 120, 124-125, 130, 149, 172- 175, 177-178, 469; Early mediaeval, 87-88, 129, 214-217, 391; Romanesque, 87-88, 129, 216, 228, 232, 322, 352, 384, 386-392, 396, 403, 447, 491-493; Gothic, 87-88, 228, 232, 322, 330, 338, 339, 346, 349, 352, 380, 384, 388, 392-403, 406, 448, 494; Renaissance, 129-130, 384, 402-409, 494- 496
asceticism, 4, 8-9, 13, 14, 15, 19, 23, 24, 26, 27, 37, 38, 45, 50, 54, 58, 60-61, 64, 66, 70, 79, 105, 144
assonance, 204, 207-208, 322, 327
astrology, Classical, 25, 28, 37, 64, 98, see also science; Islamic, 165, 167, 234, see also science; Latin Christian, 82, 184,

-559-

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The Mind of the Middle Ages, A.D. 200-1500: An Historical Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to First Edition vii
  • Acknowledgments x
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiv
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • Part One - The Dominance of the East 1
  • Chapter I - The Classical Backgrounds of Mediaeval Christianity 3
  • Chapter II - The Jewish and Early Christian Sources of Mediaeval Faith 39
  • Chapter III - The Patristic Age, 2nd-5th Centuries 64
  • Chapter IV - Byzantine Civilization 95
  • Chapter V - Islamic Civilization 132
  • Chapter VI - The Latin West, 5th-10th Centuries 179
  • Part Two - The Revival of the West, 1000-1500 223
  • Chapter VII - Learning (I) 225
  • Chapter VIII - Learning (II) 270
  • Chapter IX - Literature (I) 320
  • Chapter X - Literature (II) 355
  • Chapter XI - Art and Music 384
  • Chapter XII - Underlying Attitudes 419
  • Epilogue 443
  • Notes 456
  • Bibliographical Notes 503
  • Index 559
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