For Crying out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States

By Diane Dujon; Ann Withorn | Go to book overview

WHY EVERY WOMAN IN AMERICA
SHOULD BEWARE OF
WELFARE CUTS

Women's Committee of One Hundred

Welfare is the ultimate security policy for every woman in America. Like accident or life insurance, you hope you'll never need it. But for yourself and your family, sisters, daughters, and friends, you need to know it's there. Without it, we have no real escape from brutal relationship or any protection in a job market hostile to women with children. Why is Congress trying to take it away?

Imagine the worst. You're laid off from your job. You lose your health insurance. Your marriage falls apart. Your young children need childcare. And you have no family close enough to help.

This is the kind of thing that "happens to someone else." Someone we like to think is "different." And to underline the difference, we usually figure the woman is somehow at fault. "Why did she have kids if she can't support them?" we ask. "What's the matter with her?"

But, at heart, we know how uncomfortably close we are, ourselves, to being without support, without savings. All it takes is a few strokes of hard luck. Hard luck so common, it strikes millions of women with children every year. Women with no job security in unstable or abusive relationships, with nowhere to turn but welfare.

Would you let your employer take away your health insurance? Would you let the government cancel your social security? Of course not. But the public program that benefits struggling women

____________________
This piece comprises the text of a full page ad, placed in The New York Times, Tuesday, August 8, 1995. It was an attempt to get people involved and sway new legislation to end AFDC. In August 1996, Congress passed their Personal Responsibility legislation. A coupon/response form was a part of the original ad.

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