For Crying out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States

By Diane Dujon; Ann Withorn | Go to book overview

APOLOGIES DON'T HELP
Milwaukee welfare Warriors*THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP IN PUBLISHING FACTS AND MYTHS about those of us who receive government child support. May we ask you to go one step further in your support of our families?Popular lists of "facts" about welfare are defensive: We only have two children, only stay "on" welfare for two years, only receive $370 a month, only use up 1 percent of the federal budget, only need help temporarily to get us on our feet, would "work" if only we could afford childcare/health care or could find a job, are mainly white adults, not teens, and mainly children.These apologetic "facts" present statistical truths about welfare. However, they omit two profound realities of welfare:
1. AFDC is a public child support program.
2. Most single-mother families on welfare are victims of abuse and/or abandonment.

No other moms are called dependent or made to feel like parasitical, apologetic criminals for receiving support for their children. Widowed moms, some divorced moms, married moms all expect and receive support -- from both the government (tax deductions, Social Security) and the biological fathers. Neither they nor their children are accused of being social deviants or mentally defective (low self-esteem, etc.) because they receive economic support. Nor are they labeled "ârecipients" -- an insulting, passive, one-dimensional label of the complex being a single mother on welfare is.

And what about those of us with three, four or five children, or those of us who are teen moms? What about the moms who can't

____________________
*
This piece represents a letter written by Welfare Warriors in their fight for the lives of mothers and children: Welfare Warriors, 4504 N. 47 Street, Milwaukee, WI 53218.

-367-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
For Crying out Loud: Women's Poverty in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.