Critical Thinking across the Curriculum: A Brief Edition of Thought and Knowledge

By Diane F. Halpern | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Abortion
emotional response, 60
operational definition, 142-143
Acceptable premises, 109, see also Arguments
Accuracy
memory, 19
Acquisition, 21
Acquisition of information
awareness of noncognitive factors, 26
distribute learning, 23
generating multiple cues for retrieval, 25
getting organized, 23-24
monitoring meaning, 22-23
overlearning, 25-26
paying attention, 21-22
Advance organizers, recall, 23
Advertisements, see also Advertisers
arguments, 92
distinguishing between opinion, fact, and reasoned judgment, 132
euphemisms, 62-63
inference, 48-49
thinking critically, 6
visual arguments, 134-136
Advertisers, see also Advertisements
affirming the consequent, 86
framing of responses, 63-64
Affirming the antecedent, if, then statements, 86, see also Reasoning
Affirming the consequent, if, then statements, 86, see also Reasoning
Airlines, inference in advertisements, 48
Airport problem, anatomy, 220
Alcoholism, defining, 54
Alternatives
decision making, 206
generation for decision-making worksheets, 206-207
weighing for decision-making worksheets, 208-209
Ambiguous, 60-62
words, multiple meanings, 62
American Psychiatric Association, human behavior and mental illness, 54
Analogical thinking, creativity, 251
Analogy
creativity, 251
language, 51-54
problem solving, 237
risk assessment, 181
Analysis methods, arguments, 104-107
Anatomy of a problem, 219
"And" rule, probabilities, 167-169
Antecedent, if, then statements, 86
Appeals to,
authority, 130
ignorance, 129-130
pity, 125
pride/snobbery, 127
tradition, 131-132
Arguments, 98-139
anatomy, 98-104
applying the framework, 137-138
changing beliefs, 132-135
common fallacies, 124-132
diagramming, 104-108
distinguishing among opinion, reasoned judgment, and fact, 132-133

-276-

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