VII
LOOKING INTO ELDERSON

SOAMES had left Danby & Winter divided in thought between Elderson and "the White Monkey." As Fleur surmised, he had never forgotten Aubrey Greene's words concerning that bit of salvage from the wreck of George Forsyte. "Eat the fruits of life, scatter the rinds, and get copped doing it." His application of them tended towards the field of business.

The country was still living on its capital. With the collapse of the carrying trade and European markets, they were importing food they couldn't afford to pay for. In his opinion they would get copped doing it, and that before long. British credit was all very well, the wonder of the world and that, but you couldn't live indefinitely on wonder. With shipping idle, concerns making a loss all over the place, and the unemployed in swarms, it was a pretty pair of shoes! Even Insurance must suffer before long. Perhaps that chap Elderson had foreseen this already, and was simply feathering his nest in time. If one was to be copped in any case, why bother to be honest? This was cynicism so patent, that all the Forsyte in Soames rejected it; and yet it would keep coming back. In a general bankruptcy, why trouble with thrift, far-sightedness, integrity? Even the Conservatives were refusing to call themselves Conservatives again, as if there were something ridiculous about the word, and they knew there was really nothing left to conserve. "Eat the fruit, scatter the rinds, and get copped doing it." That young painter had said a clever

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The White Monkey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I x
  • I- Promenade 3
  • II- Home 9
  • III- Musical 28
  • V- Eve 35
  • VI- 'Old Forsyte' and 'Old Mont' 40
  • VII- Old Mont' and 'Old Forsyte' 49
  • VIII- Bicket 58
  • IX- Confusion 69
  • X- Passing of a Sportsman 81
  • XI- Venture 91
  • XII- Figures and Facts 97
  • Part II 108
  • XIII- Tenter-Hooks 113
  • I- The Mark Falls 115
  • II- Victorine 129
  • III- Michael Walks and Talks 140
  • IV- Fleur's Body 151
  • VI- Michael Gets 'What-For' 167
  • VII- The Altogether 177
  • VIII- Soames Takes the Matter Up 185
  • IX- Sleuth 194
  • X- Face 202
  • XI- Cocked Hat 207
  • XII- Going East 214
  • Part III 219
  • I- Bank Holiday 221
  • II- Office Work 229
  • III- 'Afternoon of a Dryad' 239
  • IV- Afternoon of a Bicket 244
  • V- Michael Gives Advice 250
  • VI- Quittance 258
  • VII- Looking into Elderson 261
  • IX- Soames Doesn't Give a Damn 279
  • X- But Takes No Chances 284
  • XI- With a Small N 292
  • XII- Ordeal by Shareholder 297
  • XIII- Soames at Bay 309
  • XIV- On the Rack 319
  • XV- Calm 325
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.