X
BUT TAKES NO CHANCES

MICHAEL knew nothing of the City; and, in the spirit of the old cartographers: 'Where you know nothing, place terrors,' made his way through the purlieus of the Poultry, towards that holy of holies, the offices of Cuthcott, Kingson & Forsyte. His mood was attuned to meditation, for he had been lunching with Sibley Swan at the Café Crillon. He had known all the guests--seven chaps even more modern than old Sib-- save only a Russian so modern that he knew no French and nobody could talk to him. Michael had watched them demolish everything, and the Russian closing his eyes, like a sick baby, at mention of any living name. . . . 'Carry on!' he thought, several of his favourites having gone down in the mêlée.'Stab and bludge! Importance awaits you at the end of the alley.' But he had restrained his irreverence till the moment of departure.

"Sib," he said, rising, "all these chaps here are dead --ought they to be about in this hot weather?"

"What's that?" ejaculated Sibley Swan, amidst the almost painful silence of the chaps.

"I mean--they're alive--so they must be damned!" And avoiding a thrown chocolate which hit the Russian, he sought the door.

Outside, he mused: 'Good chaps, really! Not half so darned superior as they think they are. Quite a human touch--getting that Russian on the boko. Phew! It's hot!'

On that first day of the Eton and Harrow Match, all the forfeited heat of a chilly summer had gathered, and shimmered over Michael on the top of his Bank 'bus;

-284-

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The White Monkey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I x
  • I- Promenade 3
  • II- Home 9
  • III- Musical 28
  • V- Eve 35
  • VI- 'Old Forsyte' and 'Old Mont' 40
  • VII- Old Mont' and 'Old Forsyte' 49
  • VIII- Bicket 58
  • IX- Confusion 69
  • X- Passing of a Sportsman 81
  • XI- Venture 91
  • XII- Figures and Facts 97
  • Part II 108
  • XIII- Tenter-Hooks 113
  • I- The Mark Falls 115
  • II- Victorine 129
  • III- Michael Walks and Talks 140
  • IV- Fleur's Body 151
  • VI- Michael Gets 'What-For' 167
  • VII- The Altogether 177
  • VIII- Soames Takes the Matter Up 185
  • IX- Sleuth 194
  • X- Face 202
  • XI- Cocked Hat 207
  • XII- Going East 214
  • Part III 219
  • I- Bank Holiday 221
  • II- Office Work 229
  • III- 'Afternoon of a Dryad' 239
  • IV- Afternoon of a Bicket 244
  • V- Michael Gives Advice 250
  • VI- Quittance 258
  • VII- Looking into Elderson 261
  • IX- Soames Doesn't Give a Damn 279
  • X- But Takes No Chances 284
  • XI- With a Small N 292
  • XII- Ordeal by Shareholder 297
  • XIII- Soames at Bay 309
  • XIV- On the Rack 319
  • XV- Calm 325
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