Mirror for Gotham: New York as Seen by Contemporaries from Dutch Days to the Present

By Bayrd Still | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTS

Following is an alphabetical list, by author, of the commentaries on New York City to which reference has been made in the foregoing pages. Obviously, this is by no means a complete inventory of descriptions of the city by eyewitnesses. It does constitute, however, a representative selection, with respect both to chronological coverage and to the nature, insight, and national origins of the writers who described the local scene. The earliest descriptions of the community were primarily the work of officials and residents of the Dutch outpost from which the metropolis was to grow. These were soon supplemented by the reports of royal administrators, European travelers, and visitors from other British possessions along the Atlantic coast. After 1783, when the American experiment was of increasing interest to the outside world, descriptions of New York were almost invariably included in the rapidly augmenting literature describing and, in time, attempting to interpret the American scene. Until the twentieth century, few books of a descriptive or interpretive character, other than guidebooks or gazetteers, dealt with New York City alone. By the period of the Civil War, some American writers had begun, in books and articles, to unveil the mysteries of the emerging metropolis; but not until the third decade of the twentieth century did book-length works on New York City become numerous. Then the world-wide appeal of the postwar wonder city was reflected not only in the description of it in commentaries upon the United States in general, but in books, of the most diverse authorship, about New York City itself. Since the date of publication often gives no proper indication of the time at which the observations were made, this information is supplied in the bracket concluding each citation. In some instances, for lack of precise information this date has had to be an approximation.

Abbate e Salvatore Migliore. Viaggio nella America Settentrionale. Palermo, 1853. [1845]

Abdy, E. S. Journal of a Residence and Tour in the United States of North America, from April, 1833, to October, 1834. 3 vols. London, 1835. [1833]

Achard, Paul. A New Slant on America. New York, 1931. [ 1929]

[ Acton, John E. E. Dalberg, Lord]. "Lord Acton's American Diaries," pt. I, in Fortnightly Review, n.s., CX ( 1921), 727-42. [ 1853]

Adam, Paul. Vues d'Amérique. Paris, 1906. [1904]

Adamoli, Luigi. "Letters from America, I," in The Living Age, CCCXII ( March 1922), 582-93. [ 1866-1867]

[ Adams, John]. The Works of John Adams. Ed. by Charles F. Adams. 10 vols. Boston, 1850-1856. [1774]

[ Adams, John Quincy]. Diary of John Quincy Adams, 1794-1845. Ed. by Allan Nevins . New York, 1951. [1835]

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