The Prospects for Communist China

By W. W. Rostow. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
THE EMERGENCE OF THE 'NEW GENERAL' LINE

I. THE POLICY OF INCREASED HARSHNESS: 1951-1952

Violence was a familiar aspect of the Chinese Communist performance. In his report of 1927 on the peasant movement in Hunan Mao had defended violence as a political instrument, and it was a fully sanctioned Communist technique from Lenin forward. Land reform in the Kiangsi days was a notoriously bloody operation; and it left a trail of bloodshed in the countryside in the 1948-1951 period. Nevertheless, the balance between persuasion and pressure on the one hand and violence on the other had generally been maintained in favor of the former down to 1951.

In the course of 1951-1952 the Chinese Communist government encountered a series of difficulties ranging over the whole spectrum of its activities, from land reform at the village level to the military front in Korea. The government found itself short of cash and confronted with the threat of inflation. The cadres in many areas proved inefficient and, apparently, corrupt as well; they were also evidently confused by the problem of balancing ideological objectives against efficiency as criteria for day-to-day action. The converging techniques of mass persuasion and social pressure were not yielding the expected long-term results. Signs of dissatisfaction and even of passive resistance appeared. Production, while undoubtedly rising from the abnormally low levels at the end of the civil war, was not meeting hopes or plans.

The retreat of the United Nations forces from the Yalu carried to a line some seventy miles south of the thirty-eighth parallel. By February 1951 effective United Nations counterattacks were under way, and Seoul was recaptured on March 14. In April and May the Chinese

-72-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Prospects for Communist China
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.