John Palsgrave as Renaissance Linguist: A Pioneer in Vernacular Language Description

By Gabriele Stein | Go to book overview

11
Palsgrave in Perspective

In the preceding chapters we have closely studied Palsgrave's vocabulists, their word lists, their headword structure, the French equivalents, the verb illustrations, and the interlemmatic relations. We have compared his linguistic descriptions and his lexicographical methods of presentation with earlier and contemporary works in order to show where he stays within lexicographical practice as it had developed by the early sixteenth century and where he goes beyond it. The insights gained are little short of startling. John Palsgrave was a teacher and a scholar who understood his mother tongue profoundly, who had a superb command of French, and beyond English and French a remarkable grasp of the nature of language and language pedagogy. The picture of his personality drawn from the few existing records and documents in Chapter 1 was complemented by the human and moral views and attitudes displayed in his verb illustrations in Chapters 9 and 10. He was well acquainted with Thomas More, who introduced him to Erasmus. In order to serve his king best, as Latin tutor to the king's son, he sought the professional advice of leading contemporary scholars and teachers. William Gonell, William Horman, and John Rightwise are named in his letter to More. He has also given us the names of those of his contemporaries who, like himself, were engaged on writing an introduction to the French language: Alexander Barclay, Pierre Valence, and Giles du Wes. All four knew of each other's endeavours, and Lesclarcissement de la langue francoyse, as well as the Introductions in frensshe and An introductorie for to lerne to rede to pronounce and to speke Frenche trewly, openly express what their respective authors thought of the work of their competitors. All four moved in court circles, and we might assume that they will have been acquainted with the leading men of letters and learning. In view of the fact that he was on good terms with Thomas More, it is very likely that Palsgrave will have come to know More's close friends, Colet and Lily. One may even wonder whether he had become acquainted with Johannes Ludovicus Vives, who lectured for a period at Louvain and who became a Latin tutor to the Princess Mary. He might also have been introduced to

-445-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Palsgrave as Renaissance Linguist: A Pioneer in Vernacular Language Description
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 511

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.