White-Collar Criminal: The Offender in Business and the Professions

By Gilbert Geis | Go to book overview

25
RUSSIA SHOOTS ITS BUSINESS CROOKS

George Feifer

When Stanislaw Wawrzecki was executed in Warsaw late in March, 1965, Polish intellectuals blanched and muttered bitterly. Wawrzecki had been convicted as the mastermind of a conspiracy to divert meat belonging to state stores to sell for private profit; over a decade, the court found, the conspiracy had netted some 3.5 million zlotys (officially $150,000). His execution was apparently Poland's first in some 10 years for an economic crime, and it provoked strong resentment.

"What is the price now for human life in Poland?" asked a Warsaw resident. "Is it a ton of meat or only half a ton?"

"This is something for Asia, but not for a European country," another Pole protested.

"Asia" was probably a euphemism for " Russia" where (confirming Polish scorn for Muscovite barbarity) executions for economic crimes are now common. Only two weeks after Wawrzecki's execution, one T. Chkekheidze, the chief engineer of a Soviet candy factory, was convicted of masterminding a ring that had embezzled $76,000 by substituting

____________________
Reprinted from The New York Times Magazine ( May 2, 1965), pp. 32-33, 111-112. © 1965 by The New York Times Company.

-320-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White-Collar Criminal: The Offender in Business and the Professions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.