Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 5

By Augustine; John W. Rettig | Go to book overview

TRACTATE 113
On John 18.13-27

AFTER THE PERSECUTORS, when Judas betrayed him, took the Lord into custody and bound him, who loved us and delivered himself up for us,1. and when the Father did not spare but delivered him up for us all,2. that one may understand that Judas is not praiseworthy for the usefulness of his betrayal but damnable for the willfulness of his wicked act, "They had led him away," as John the Evangelist relates, "to Annas first." Nor does he omit mention of the reason why it was so done: "For he was," he says, "father-in-law to Caiphas who was the high priest that year." "Now Caiphas," he says, "was he who gave the counsel to the Jews that it was expedient for one man to die for the people." And Matthew, since he wanted to relate it more briefly, properly recounts that he was led to Caiphas;3. for he was also taken first to Annas precisely because he was his father-in-law, and here one must understand that Caiphas himself wanted this to be done.4.

2. "But since Peter," he says, "followed Jesus and [so did] another disciple." Who this disciple is ought not to be rashly asserted since no mention is made. However it is usual for this same John thus to signify himself and to add, "whom Jesus loved."5."Now that disciple," he says, "was known to the high priest and went in with Jesus into the court of the high priest; but Peter stood at the door outside. The other disciple, there

____________________
1.
Cf. Eph 5.2.
2.
Cf. Rom 8.32.
3.
Cf. Mt 26.57. Neither Mk nor Lk name the high priest.
4.
In section 5 Augustine explains why Jesus was sent to Annas first, that there were two high priests serving alternate years and although it was Caiphas' year, Jesus was sent first to Annas, not because of priority in rank but because Annas was his father-in-law. This Annas (in Josephus Ananos) was appointed high priest in A.D. 6 by Quirinius and deposed in A.D. 15. R. E. Brown, 29A.820-21, gives several reasons why he may have retained the title of high priest among the Jews. See also JBC 2.458 and "Anan ben Seth," Encyclopedia Judaica ( Jerusalem 1971) 2.922.
5.
See Jn 13.23, 19.26, 20.2, and 21.7.

-9-

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Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 5
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Select Bibliography for Tr in Ev ix
  • Select Bibliography for Tr in Io Ep xi
  • Tractates on the Gospel of John 112-24 1
  • Tractate 112 on John 18.1-12 3
  • Tractate 113 on John 18.13-27 9
  • Tractate 114 on John 18.28-32 16
  • Tractate 115 on John 18.33-40 21
  • Tractate 116 on John 19.1-16 27
  • Tractate 117 33
  • Tractate 118 39
  • Tractate 119 45
  • Tractate 120 50
  • Tractate 121 on John 20.10-29 56
  • Tractate 122 on John 20.30-31, 21.1-11 62
  • Tractate 123 74
  • Tractate 124 - On John 21.19-25 82
  • Tractates on the First Epistle of John 1-10 95
  • Introduction 97
  • Prologue 119
  • Tractate 1 on 1 Jn 1.1-2.11 121
  • Tractate 2 on I Jn 2.12--17 141
  • Tractate 3 on 1 Jn 2.18-27 159
  • Tractate 4 on 1 Jn 2.27-3.9 173
  • Tractate 5 on 1 Jn 3.9-18 185
  • Tractate 6 on 1 Jn 3.18-4.3 198
  • Tractate 7 217
  • Tractate 8 on I Jn 4.12-16 228
  • Tractate 9 on 1 Jn 4.17-21 246
  • Tractate 10 on 1 Jn 5.1-3 262
  • Indices 279
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