The Homosexualization of America: The Americanization of the Homosexual

By Dennis Altman | Go to book overview

Introduction

In the summer of 1980 I was in Washington, D. C., for the celebration of Gay Pride Day. It was a hot day, and perhaps 10,000 people had jammed into P Street Park, just down the road from the gay bars near Dupont Circle, to listen to music and speeches; buy badges, T-shirts, and books; eat hot dogs, homemade cookies, lemon- ade, even Jewish delicacies (at the Bet Mispuchah stand); or have their hair cut, all in the interests of raising money for the Whitman- Walker clinic. In all, the organizers listed thirty-eight booths, plus an open-air art fair and a softball match between the Lesbian/Gay team and the City Council Homerulers.

The day began with a marching band, an echo of all those school and college bands in which the boys had longed to twirl the batons (but that was too sissy) and the girls to beat the drums (too butch). Here they were, the D. C. Different Drummers, players in dark-blue uniforms, women and men, marching boys in red satin matched with white mock construction helmets, and the crowd parted, applauding, to let them through. (Gay marching bands and choirs are a particularly American phenomenon that have come into existence in a number of cities, often with patriotic names like the Great American Freedom Marching Band.)

It was more like a traditional country fair than the commercial street fairs in New York and San Francisco, and the crowd was appropriately mixed: almost as many women as men, large numbers of blacks, even a few children wandering through with their parents. The speakers included some city councillors and the mayor of Washington, who knew very well the political importance of the gay community. (The gay vote was an important factor in the election of Marion Barry as mayor in 1978, and he has sought to pay his debts.)

"I can't stand all these clones together," hissed my friend David, who was working one of the booths. "Look at that one"--

-vi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Homosexualization of America: The Americanization of the Homosexual
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.