Measurement in Physical Education

By Donald K. Mathews; Nancy Allison Close | Go to book overview

chapter 3
analysis of test scores
To prepare a delicious dinner, set the table, and fail to sit down to enjoy the meal is just as ridiculous as failing to analyze the measurement data after the test has been administered. In the following pages we will attempt to explain the analysis of test data.The statistical know-how required for the necessary analysis of test scores for use in a physical education program is not difficult. Even if, as a youngster, you were frightened by an integer, the phobia should not prevent you from comprehending the statistical analyses presented in this chapter. In order to obtain from the data an adequate realization for the effort spent in its collection, the scores must be analyzed. There are answers to perhaps five questions that we might want to derive from these data:
1. How did the group as a whole do on the test?
2. How does each individual stand in relation to the group?
3. How can we homogeneously group the pupils?
4. How can we use these scores for grading purposes?
5. How do we go about constructing norms?

The following approach to analysis of test data places emphasis upon the interpretation of test scores rather than upon explanation of theory and derivation of techniques employed. The specific steps to the final answer are outlined in detail.


Statistical Analysis

When baking a cake, the average homemaker does not understand the chemical effects of the ingredients she uses. However, if she is careful and follows directions, the product is quite gratifying. Somewhat similar application of this principle will yield excellent results in manipulation

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