Measurement in Physical Education

By Donald K. Mathews; Nancy Allison Close | Go to book overview

physical education program: (1) the screening phase, the primary purpose of which is to locate the seriously deficient requiring individual attention; and (2) the general instructional phase, the primary purpose of which is twofold: to allow practice of such specific skills as standing, walking, and sitting, and, at the same time, to assign a mark of proficiency in each of the events; and (3) the more definitive measurement, which is used with those pupils seriously deficient--the ones who have been placed in an individual program on the basis of the screening test.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Bancroft, Jesse H.: The Posture of School Children. New York, The Macmillan Co., 1913.

2. Boynton, Bernice: Individual Differences in the Structure of Pelvis and Lumbar Spine as a Factor in Body Mechanics. M.A. Thesis, State University of Iowa, 1933.

3. Brownell, C. L.: A Scale for Measuring Anterior-Posterior Posture of Ninth Grade Boys. New York, Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1928.

4. Carnett, J. B.: Extracts from Discussion. White House Conference on Child Health and Protection, Body Mechanics: Education and Practice. New York, The Century Co., 1932.

5. Clarke, H. Harrison: "An Objective Method of Measuring the Height of the Longitudinal Arch in Foot Examinations". Research Quart., Vol. 4, No. 3, October, 1933.

6. Crampton, C. W.: "Work-a-Day Tests of Good Posture". American Physical Education Review, Vol. 30, November, 1925.

7. Cureton, Thomas K.: "The Validity of Footprints as a Measure of Vertical Height of the Arch and Functional Efficiency of the Foot". Research Quart., Vol. 6, No. 2, May, 1935.

8. Cureton, Thomas K., and Wickens, J. Stuart: "The Center of Gravity of the Human Body in the Antero-posterior Plane and Its Relation to Posture, Physical Fitness, and Athletic Ability". Supplement to Research Quart., Vol. 6, No. 2, May, 1935.

9. Cureton, Thomas K., Wickens, J. Stuart, and Elder, Haskel P.: "Reliability and Objectivity of Springfield Postural Measurements". Supplement to Research Quart., Vol. 6, No. 2, May, 1935.

10. Danford, Harold R.: "A Comparative Study of Three Methods of Measuring Flat and Weak Feet". Supplement to Research Quart., Vol. 6, No. 1, March, 1935.

11. Fox, M. S., and Young, O. S.: "Placement of Gravital Line in Antero-posterior Standing Posture". Research Quart., Vol. 25, No. 3, October, 1954.

12. Glassow, Ruth: Fundamentals in Physical Education. Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1932.

13. Goldthwait, J. F., Brown, L. T., Swaim, L. T., and Kuhns, J. G.: Body Mechanics in the Study and Treatment of Disease. Philadelphia, Lea & Febiger, 1930.

14. Howland, Ivalclare Sprow: Body Alignment in Fundamental Motor Skills. New York, Exposition Press, 1953.

15. Howland, Ivalclare S.: A Study of the Position of the Sacrum in the Adult Female Pelvis and Its Relationship to Body Mechanics. M.A. Thesis, State University of Iowa, 1933.

16. Karpovich, Peter V., and Sinning, Wayne E.: Physiology of Muscular Activity. 7th ed. Philadelphia & London, W. B. Saunders Co., 1971.

17. Klein, A., and Thomas, L. C.: Posture and Physical Fitness. Children's Bureau, Publication No. 205. Washington, D. C., Government Printing Office, 1931.

18. Kraus, Hans, and Weber, S.: "Evaluation of Posture Based on Structural and Functional Measurements". Physiotherapy Rev., Vol. 26, No. 6, 1945.

-336-

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